Center for Interdisziplinary Research
 
 

Dirk Schlimm, PhD

McGill University
Email: dirk.schlimm@mcgill.ca



Academic Background

Dirk Schlimm is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at McGill University, Montreal. He received his PhD from Carnegie Mellon University in 2005, and studied previously at Trinity College Dublin and Technical University of Darmstadt. His research interests fall into the areas of history and philosophy of mathematics and science, epistemology, and cognitive science. In particular, he is interested in the developments in the 19th and early 20th century that led to the emergence of modern mathematics and logic, and in systematic investigations regarding axiomatics, analogical reasoning, concept formation, mathematical cognition, the use of notation (in particular for systems of numerals), and theory development. His current research project is "Empiricism in mathematics". He is also involved in editorial projects of the works of Bernays, Hilbert, and Carnap.



Five Recent Publications

Schlimm, D. (forth.). Methodological reflections on typologies for numeral systems (with Widom, T.R.). Science in Context.

Schlimm, D. (2010). The cognitive basis of arithmetic (with de Cruz, H. and Neth, H.). In: Löwe, B. & Müller, T. (Eds.) Philosophy of Mathematics: Sociological Aspects and Mathematical Practice, pp. 39-86. College Publications, London.

Schlimm, D. (2010). Pasch's philosophy of mathematics. Review of Symbolic Logic 3(1), 93-118.

Schlimm, D. (2008). Two ways of analogy: Extending the study of analogies to mathematical domains. Philosophy of Science 75(2), 178-200.

Schlimm, D. (2008) Modeling ancient and modern arithmetic practices: Addition and multiplication with Arabic and Roman numerals (with Hansjörg Neth). In: Sloutsky,V., Love,B., & McRae, K. (Eds.) Proceedings of the 30th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, pp. 2007-2012.Cognitive Science Society, Austin.



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