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Bielefeld Graduate School
in History and Sociology
Logo der Einrichtung
Logo der Einrichtung

Structures and Events - a Dialogue between History and Sociology


7th Annual Seminar of the Bielefeld Graduate School in History and Sociology (BGHS), 29 June to 1 July 2015

Annual Seminar 2015
PDF

Welcome Address

Dear participants and guests,
We are pleased to welcome you to the 7th Annual Seminar of the Bielefeld Graduate School in History and Sociology (BGHS). Thank you for coming to Bielefeld and for contributing such stimulating papers and presentations to our conference!

Our topic this year is "Structures and Events - A Dialogue between History and Sociology". Both of our disciplines here at the graduate school share a common interest in how the interplay and entanglement of structures and events shape experiences, activities, institutions and societies. The aim of this year's Annual Seminar is to revive the dialogue between different strands of research on structures and events and to engage doctoral and junior scholars in fruitful conversations about their approaches, methods and empirical findings.

Our programme consists of five panel sessions for the discussion of individual contributions and three keynotes by distinguished researchers. For these keynotes, we especially welcome and thank Tobias Werron (Bonn), William Sewell (Chicago) and Hans Mathias Kepplinger (Mainz).
We are looking forward to exciting presentations and keynotes and to vibrant discussions with you!

Your organising committee of the Annual Seminar 2015
André Meyer, Thomas Müller, Tauqeer Hussain Shah, Ramy Youssef, Lili Zhu


Programme

Annual Seminar 2015

Detailed programme of the 7th Annual Seminar as PDF


Timetable

Conference Location: Center for Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF)


Monday, 29 June 2015


  • 02:00 pm Registration

  • 03:00 pm
      Welcome Address
      Ursula Mense-Petermann, Deputy Director of the BGHS

      Introduction to the Topic

      Keynote (Sociology)
      Tobias Werron (Bonn): Simultaneity as a Historical-Sociological Problem
  • 05:30pm Keynote (History)
    William Sewell (Chicago): The Temporalities of Social Life: Thoughts for the Anthropocene

  • Tuesday, 30 June 2015


  • 09:00 am Reception

  • 09:30 am - 05:00 pm Panel Sessions I-IV

    • 09:30 am Panel Session I
    • Panel A: Structures, Events and the Politics of Family
    • Panel B: Globality/Locality in the Historical Development Education Systems
      11:00 am Panel Session II
    • Panel A: Historical Memory
    • Panel B: Structures and Events in Policymaking
      02:00 pm Panel Session III
    • Panel A: Capitalist Structures and Events
    • Panel B: Religious Structures and Events
      04:00 pm Panel Session IV
    • Panel A: Types of Events: "Crucial" and "Planned" Events
    • Panel B: The Structures of Violence and the Violence of Events
  • 06:00 pm PUBLIC LECTURE
  • Hans Mathias Kepplinger (Mainz): Ereignisse als Gegenstand öffentlicher Kommunikation
    (Events as Objects of Public Communication; Simultaneous translation in English provided)

  • Wednesday, 1 July 2015


      09:30 am - 11:00 am Panel Session V
    • Revolutionary Events

  • 11:30 am Final Discussion

  • End of the Conference

  • Annual Seminar 2015

    About the Annual Seminar 2015

    What are structures? What are events? How do they relate to each other? These questions are of pivotal theoretical and methodological importance both in History and Sociology. They have informed and shaped debates between structuralist and (inter-)actionist theories and between structural and event history. More recently, approaches in both disciplines have begun to focus on the interplay and interdependence of structures and events. These approaches emphasise, for instance, the salience of social practices, cultures of commemoration, historical memories as well as path dependencies and critical junctures. They thereby make the complex and diverse entanglements of structures and events visible, both at the "macro"- and "micro"-levels: At the macro-level certain events disrupt and re-shape social, cultural, economic and political structures and sometimes become elements and/or causes of social transformations (e.g. revolutions, natural catastrophes, discoveries or inventions). At the micro-level, deliberate or accidental violations of behavioural norms can be described as critical events which make the vulnerability of norms visible but simultaneously contribute to their stabilisation and/or transformation. Finally, the interplay of global structures and local events, on which globalisation studies and global history focus, calls into question traditional micro/macro-dichotomies and poses the challenge of their theorisation.

    The 7th BGHS Annual Seminar aims to deepen the dialogue between History and Sociology, and especially between junior scholars of both disciplines (PhD students and Postdoc-level) whose work tackles with the differences and entanglements of structures and events. Despite some notable exceptions, both History and Sociology have tended to study these issues within their disciplinary boundaries. The Annual Seminar intends to bring these different traditions of research together in order to identify promising lines of inquiry and to advance a more comprehensive and interdisciplinary understanding of how structures and events relate to each other.


    Topics and Questions

    In order to further the interdisciplinary dialogue the topics and questions of the 7th Annual Seminar will be:

    • Promising theoretical approaches: How do the different disciplines theorise and think about "structures" and "events" and the different ways in which they interlink and influence each other? How can approaches and insights from sociology help to better understand relevant questions in history and vice versa?
    • Methodological issues: Are events to be construed as evidence, examples, illustrations or manifestations of structures? Can structures be described and studied without referring to events and vice versa? Can structures be reduced to sequences of events or are they to be considered as emergent phenomena?
    • Crucial events: What makes some events more important than others? How do certain events become "shapers" or "makers" of social structures and social transformations? What role do critical moments like lapses or faux pas in face-to-face interaction play not only in their immediate but also in a wider societal context? What do events like the French Revolution, the fall of the Berlin Wall, 9/11, the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers or the Fukushima nuclear accident tell us about the interplay of structures and events and the possibility/capacity of events to influence and change structures?
    • Global structures and local events, local structures and global events: How do global social, economic, political and cultural structures and events impact upon and shape local events and practices? How much "resistance" is possible for local practices and cultures in the face of global structures? And how do some local events become signifiers of globality (e.g. Olympic Games)?
    • Historical memories in discourses about the present and future: What role do social and historical memories play in societal discourses and practices? How are some past events construed as "historical lessons" able to guide actors in apparently structurally similar situations (e.g. the Munich conference of 1938 and the effects of "appeasement politics")? How do societies observe and narrate their history and envisage their future ? and what relative weight do they thereby assign to key events (e.g. major wars, declarations of independence) and the continuity or change of certain structures (e.g. the contemporary idea of an ever-faster changing world)?

    Poster Keynotes and Public Lecture

    Annual Seminar 2015
    PDF

    Annual Seminar 2015
    PDF

    Media

  • Ereignisse existieren nicht unabhängig von Medien (uni.aktuell, 24. Juni 2015)

  • Events don't have an existence independent from the media (uni.aktuell, 26 June 2015)

  • Media

    Video

    Vorlesungen Annual Seminar 2015

    William Sewell (Chicago): The Temporalities of Social Life: Thoughts for the Anthropocene (46 min.)




    Hans Mathias Kepplinger (Mainz): Ereignisse als Gegenstand öffentlicher Kommunikation (43 min.)


    Tobias Werron (Bonn): Simultaneity as a Historical-Sociological Problem (36 min.)

    Picture Gallery

     
    Welcome Address
    (Ursula Mense-Petermann, Deputy Director of the BGHS)


     


     
    Introduction to the Topic
    (Thomas Müller, Organising committee)


     
    Keynote (Sociology)
    Tobias Werron (Bonn): Simultaneity as a Historical-Sociological Problem


     


     
    Keynote (History)
    William Sewell (Chicago): The Temporalities of Social Life: Thoughts for the Anthropocene


     


     


     
    Participants of the 7th Annual Seminar


     
    Presentation Panel Session


     
    Discussion Panel Session


     


     


     
    Overview Annual Seminars since 2009


     
    Panel Session


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     
    Public Lecture
    Hans Mathias Kepplinger (Mainz): Ereignisse als Gegenstand öffentlicher Kommunikation (Events as Objects of Public Communication)


     


     


     


     
    Panel Session


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     
    Final Discussion


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     
    Participants of the 7th Annual Seminar


     


     


    Organising Committee

    Annual Seminar 2015

    Your organising committee of the Annual Seminar 2015
    André Meyer, Thomas Müller, Tauqeer Hussain Shah, Ramy Youssef, Lili Zhu

    -> weitere Meldungen

    InterDisciplines

    Current volume InDi

    Gefördert durch:

    Exzellenzinitiative zur Förderung der Hochschulen
    (1. Förderphase 2007-2012,
    2. Förderphase 2012-2017)



    Gefördert durch: