Universität Bielefeld

© Universität Bielefeld

Institut für
interdisziplinäre Konflikt- und Gewaltforschung

Misrecognising Minorities in Europe. Challenges to Integration and Security (MisMiE)

Short Description

One of the most relevant challenges for European societies is to avoid the isolation, separation or withdrawal of groups from mainstream society. Contemporary events show that minorities in Europe can be marginalized in European society, and that this can make them prone to adopting separatist attitudes and beliefs.

The project investigates the importance of misrecognition in this process. Recognition is defined as the extent to which members of minorities feel that they are viewed by others as belonging to the nation. The project strives to understand the experiences which give rise to the sense of misrecognition and, more particularly, the role that surveillance plays in this. Moreover, it wants to understand the consequences of a state of misrecognition. When does it lead to a sense of estrangement whereby minority group members withdraw from participation and cooperation with others in the national community and with national authorities? When does it lead to becoming actively anti-community and anti-authority?

The focus will be on two significant minorities in different regions of the European Union: Muslims in the West and Roma people in the East. Recent models of intergroup relations are applied to address these questions. Estrangement is regarded as arising out of interactions between minority groups and authorities.

A multi-method approach is used to study these issues combing methods of experimentation and ethnography of everyday experience with interviews and surveys. Research is conducted in four Western European countries Germany, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and France) and three Eastern European countries (Hungary, Serbia, and Romania).

Duration
01/2019-12/2020

Project Directors

Prof. Dr. Andreas Zick
Bielefeld University, Germany
Institute for Interdisciplinary Conflict and Violence Research (IKG)

Prof. Dr. Stephen Reicher
University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom
School of Psychology and Neuroscience


Project Coordinator

Dr. Arin H. Ayanian
Bielefeld University, Germany
Institute for Interdisciplinary Conflict and Violence Research (IKG)


Project Participants

Prof. Dr. Bertjan Doosje
University of Amsterdam (UvA), Netherlands
Social Psychology

Dr. Anna Kende
Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary
Institute of Psychology
Department of Social Psychology

Prof. Dr. Nick Hopkins
University of Dundee, United Kingdom
School of Social Sciences
Psychology

Dr. Samuel Pehrson
University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom
School of Psychology and Neuroscience

Prof. Dr. Andreea Ernst-Vintila
Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, France
Social Sciences and Administration
Parisian Research Centre in Social Psychology


Funded by
Volkswagen Foundation (Challenges for Europe)