Universität Bielefeld

© Universität Bielefeld

British and American Studies/
Anglistik

BA
Current Students
Dates and Deadlines

Deadlines for module exams in BM 2 and BM 3

Students in the new BA (2011) should note that before they can attempt the module exams in the Profilphase or the Vertiefungsphase, they must have completed and passed the module exams in BM 2 and BM 3. This means that you cannot write your profile-module paper in PM 2 or PM 3, or attempt the oral exam in PM 4, before you have passed the module paper in BM 2 and the module exam in BM 3. (N.B.: this regulation does not affect the Proficiency Test, the module exam in BM 1. You can take this whenever you feel ready for it.)

In order to help you assess and improve your academic writing skills, you will be asked to show your BM 2 module paper to the person who will read your profile-module paper. (A similar regulation obtains for the Bachelor thesis, see its module description.)


The Oral Exam in PM 4

As set down in the module description, students will be examined on The History of the English Language and two more lectures of their choice. The complete material from all three lectures is relevant for the exam. All three parts of the exam must be passed; they are weighted equally to calculate the module grade. Students register for the exam by sending an email to the module coordinator, Dr. Angela Stock, at this address:

Registration_Ang_PM4@uni-bielefeld.de

They should state a) the three lectures in which they want to be examined and b) in which semester(s) they attended each lecture. As a rule, students will be examined by the person who gave they lecture they attended. Students must have registered for the upcoming exam at least four weeks in advance! Students will then be allotted a certain day and time for their exam. (N. B. This time slot is binding and can only be changed under extreme circumstances, like medical emergencies.) As a rule, the main exam week of each semester is the week after teaching ends. In addition, one Saturday per semester will be fixed as the second exam date; as a rule, this will be a Saturday in the fifth or sixth week of the semester. (The exact date will be announced each semester via newsletter.)

Language Proficiency Test

The Language Proficiency Test is a test for students of English to show their mastery of the English language after improving their English in the basic modules of their studies, and through engaging with the language in their free time. The Language Proficiency Test is mandatory and cannot be replaced by any other certificate or test. For students who started their degrees in or after 2011, it is the Modulprüfung for BM1. Students should take the test during their first four semesters whenever they feel ready to attempt it. Students who began their studies before 2011 normally take the LPT in their fifth semester or later.

The Language Proficiency Test should not be confused with the Entrance Test. Students need to pass the Entrance Test prior to starting a degree in British and American Studies; the Proficiency Test takes place while studying in the programme.


Details and Procedures

The written test takes one hour and the 10-minute orals take place on dates close to the date of the written test. An interview schedule will be sent by e-mail before the written test.

Written task
In the 60 minute written test, students write a summary of a German text and complete tasks related to grammar, usage and lexical control. There are no theoretical questions that require "rules" to be stated or metalinguistic knowledge to be displayed.
Interview:
The interview will be an informal conversation in which the students can talk for about 10 minutes about a topic that interests them. Candidates should think of something they would like to talk about to the examiners for the first few minutes of the test. From there, the conversation will develop naturally. This is not a "Referat", and candidates should not learn a text about their topic by heart. They will be assessed on

  • GRAMMAR (e.g. appropriateness, variety of structures, effectiveness, repairs, accuracy);
  • PRONUNCIATION (including features such as weak forms, 'th' sounds and other phonemes, word stress, appropriate intonation, absence of final devoicing and fluency);
  • LEXIS (e.g. range of appropriate lexical resources, successful paraphrases, absence of false friends, correct collocations, idiomatic usage);
  • DISCOURSE ORGANISATION, CONTENT (e.g. cohesion, coherence, flexibility, variety, density rather than padding)
  • GENERAL IMPRESSION ( e.g. ease, assurance, resources, strategies)
.
Regulations

Information on the Fächerspezifische Bestimmungen (FsB)

FsB are the regulations which apply to your BA studies.

  • For the FsB for the BA from WS 2011/2012, plus further information, please follow this link: BA Anglistik, 2011
  • For information on the FsB of February 2005, please see these Links. These regulations apply to students who took up their BA studies in Anglistik in the winter semester 2004/2005 or later.
  • The FsB of July 2003 apply to students who took up their BA studies in Anglistik at Bielefeld University before (or in) the summer semester 2004. If such students wish to change to one of the newer FsBs, they are advised to consult the academic advisor or contact the Prüfungsamt.
Plagiarism

What is plagiarism?
Plagiarism is using someone else's intellectual property and pretending it is your own; it is regarded as an extremely serious offence in any academic community
.

For examples please see the following website, under the section "Writing":
http://www.uefap.com/writing/writfram.htm
(link used with kind permission of Andy Gillett).

In this Department, we regard copying and pasting from Internet sources or copying down passages from books as unfair and unethical. It is equally unethical to hand in a paper which you have bought from a website or paid someone to write for you, or to present work that a friend or relative has written for you as if it were your own. Consistently failing to state that you are quoting from other writers or using their ideas in a paper constitutes intellectual theft as well. We will take appropriate action if we discover that plagiarism has been committed; in extremely serious cases, this could result in expulsion from the university.

Term Papers
Languages and Linguistics

You are planning to write a Hausarbeit in one of the Linguistics courses this term? The linguistics teachers will give you as much support as possible. Here are some hints on what to expect from us and what we expect from you.

Structure

Title page

See Styles section.

Table of Contents

with section numbers, subsection numbers, page numbers (by the way - your term paper is not a book, so it contains Sections and Subsections, not Chapters)

Introduction

The introduction contains your motivation for dealing with the topic. State your goal in relation to the problem, give plausible examples and a brief outline of the paper.

Theoretical part

A linguistic paper is, in informal terms, about 50% "theory" and 50% "practice" (see "Empirical part" below). The theoretical part gives the background of the paper, an accurate formulation of the problem and appropriate methods for solving it, contains a discussion of the research that has already been done on the topic and presents these results accurately and systematically. It ends with a formulation of your working hypothesis.

Empirical part

First, you describe your data collection and analysis (Participants, Method, Analysis), then you present your results.

Discussion and Conclusion

In the discussion you give a summary of your results and relate them to the goals discussed in the Introduction and to the findings discussed in the theoretical part. Discuss problems which occurred and open questions which remain. Finally, possible applications of the results can be mentioned. You may also wish to give an outlook on further developments.

References

In the references you list all works cited in your paper according to the styles listed below.

Appendix

You may have extensive corpus data, tables of results, and so on. These belong in an appendix. For some kinds of paper you may also wish to include a floppy disk or a CD-ROM.

Remember that the basic function of any linguistics paper is to persuade the scientific community of the relevance, value and innovative value of your results. In principle, this also applies to your term paper.

Styles

The main point to remember is that formatting styles are intended to help your reader to read the paper as easily as possible and concentrate on what you are saying (which is obviously in your own interest, too).

Please make sure you follow these conventions in your paper. You will find standard examples of how to format a linguistics paper in linguistic periodicals such as Journal of Linguistics, Language in Society, Linguistics.

Format your paper neatly with a standard formatting system such as OpenOffice, Word or LaTeX, using appropriately defined document styles (e.g. Heading 1, Heading 2, ...) and text objects (lists and tables instead of tabs).

Titlepage

Tables and Graphs

in the text are numbered and contain some explanation. Example: Table 4. Number of students taking linguistics exams from 1980 to 1999. Table captions are given above the table, graph captions below the graph.

References in the text ...

? are given in short form (author's name, year of publication:page) and NOT with a footnote Example: As Muller (1995:322) pointed out ... Distinguish clearly between what you find in the literature and your own contribution.

References in the bibliography ...

have the following style

  • articles:

    Author's surname, initial. (Year). "Titel of article". Name of Journal Number of Issue, page numbers. Example: Smith, J. (1965). "What's new in linguistics?" Journal of Linguistics 4, 324-335.

  • articles in books:

    Author's surname, initial. (Year). "Titel of article". In: Editor's initials, surname (ed), Title of book, place: publisher, pp. page numbers. Example: Smith, J. (1985). "What's new in linguistics?" In: D. Lightfoot (ed.), New horizons in linguistics, London: London University Press, pp. 103-107.

  • books:

    Author's surname, initial. (Year). Title of book. Place: Publisher. Example: Muller, G. (1998). What I like about linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Language

Scientific English is quite a different register from spoken English. Please make sure you use appropriate expressions and vocabulary. Avoid first and second person pronouns - you are not writing to a pen-friend or expressing a simple opinion but carefully formulating results which are intended to be more generally valid.

Example
instead of writing "And then I looked at how long the vowel /a/ is before the /r/" write something along the lines of "Subsequently, the length of the vowel /a/ preceding an /r/ was measured". Again, check linguistic papers in Journals to get a feeling for the style!

Writing stages

Writing a linguistic paper involves the following steps:

  1. Planning and finding of topic

    First of all you need to find a topic. Please don't expect us to give you a topic because you yourself know best where your interests lie. In order to find a topic re-read the course materials and ask yourself the following questions:

    • What is especially interesting about the topic of the course?
    • Which part is most fascinating for me?
    • Which parts raises the most questions for me?
    • Which is the main question I would like to discuss in my paper?

    After you have found your topic please come to our office hour. We'll help you with the next stage of reading and cutting down your topic and data collection.

  2. Reading and cutting down your topic

    When you have found a topic for your paper read what has been written about the topic so far. We will suggest literature to you if you like. We will also help you to formulate your topic precisely, i.e. decide which aspects you should discuss and which you might leave out. You will then have the central question/hypothesis of your paper.

  3. Collecting data

    Your hypothesis determines what kind of data you should collect. We will help you with the technical aspects if you like.

  4. First version

    Next you write a first version of your paper according to the structure and styles outlined here. You can hand in parts of the first version for feedback if you want.

  5. Revision
    • Even if you did not hand in the first version you will have to revise your paper. You will probably notice flaws in your argumentation, gaps or other things that need to be revised.
    • Also check your spelling please! It is a good idea to give a version to a friend because they will notice more and other things than you yourself.
    • Another good idea is to read what you have written aloud to someone else. Then you will notice awkward formulations and other kinds of errors and understand better how to structure your writing and get new ideas.
    • Double check your bibliographical references!
  6. Submission

    Only after revision submit your paper and have a rest.

Support

Writing a Hausarbeit is a skill that needs to be learned. Hausarbeiten are your chance to practice writing before you write your Masters thesis or Staatsexamensarbeit, which will determine much of your final grade. So please make use of the support we offer for writing Hausarbeiten. In detail we will help you with

  • reading suggestions and cutting down your topic/hypothesis
  • suggestions for data collection and analysis
  • feedback for (parts of) the first version
  • feedback and grade for the final version
If you experience trouble at any stage please come and see us or contact us by email.

Furthermore, the Schreiblabor regularly offers courses and advice.

Email: schreiblabor@uni-bielefeld.de

Grades

As a general principle

Grade 3 means you have followed the following instructions and got the facts right,

Grade 2 means you have done this and succeeded in placing the question you deal with in its scientific context,

Grade 1 means you have done all this and contributed your own constructive criticism and new ideas on the subject.

In particular we mark the following aspects

Clarity of structure and expression We expect logical argumentation, precise discussion and a clearly structured paper. Please check this in your revision!

Scientific treatment of topic We expect a correct account of the facts and an awareness of their relevance to the field.

Your own ideas We mark the originality of your ideas and your discussion and presentation of your results and the literature you read.

Presentation We expect a formally correct clear presentation according to the styles outlined above.

We will discuss your grade with you in detail and give you suggestions on how (if) your next papers can be improved.

Literary and Cultural Studies
How to Write a Literary Studies Term Paper or Thesis
The purpose of a research paper in literary criticism or literary theory ...

is to convince your reader of your opinion on one or more particular texts, authors, movements, periods, theories etc. The opinion or argument that you prove in a research paper is called your thesis. This thesis is usually presented at the end of your introduction.

It should consist of a fairly specific and precise announcement. A statement like "In the speeches of John Winthrop and Jonathan Edwards there are many similarities but also differences" is too vague. A better thesis would be: "While John Winthrop's speeches use religious doctrines to defend a democratic social model, Jonathan Edwards employs Scripture primarily to promote a strongly religious behavior among his listeners."

Before you start writing the paper
  1. Read the primary text(s). While you read the text(s), mark passages that you could later quote.
  2. Think of a thesis for your paper and make an outline for how you are going to prove that your thesis is true.
  3. Using bibliographies and other research tools, find secondary material on your topic. Do not use secondary sources as any kind of "ultimate" or "absolute" truth, though. Instead, evaluate them critically. In your research paper you may argue that a critic is right about a particular point or that he/she is wrong about a particular point. Be aware that internet sources are often limited in their accuracy or usefulness. ALWAYS CONSULT THE MLA INTERNATIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY (available in electronic form at the library computer terminals under (Datenbanken). Materials not available at Bielefeld can be ordered through inter-library loan (Fernleihe).
Parts of a research paper

Research papers generally consist of: - title page, - table of contents, - main text, - notes, - works cited.

  1. Title page

    Other than the title of your paper, its first page should also contain the name of the university, the seminar title, the name of the professor or instructor, the semester, and your own name.

  2. Table of contents

    The title page is followed by a (detailed) table of contents. Use either the outline format A.I.1.a. or 1.1.1.1. For each section of your paper, the table of contents lists the page number on which that section starts. Title page and table of contents should not be counted in your page numbering..

  3. Main text

    The three main parts of a research paper's main text are:

    1. Introduction (with the paper's thesis)
    2. Body (containing support or proof for the thesis) and
    3. Conclusion (summing up results, mentioning what aspects you were unable to address in more detail, or pointing the way for further research on this or a related topic)
    The body of your paper is by far the longest part.

  4. Notes

    You may use footnotes or endnotes. If you use endnotes, start a "Notes" section on a new page after the conclusion of your paper. Use notes sparingly. The main purpose of notes is to give related information that would be distracting in the paper's main text. Notes are also often used to critically evaluate secondary sources.

  5. Works cited

    It is now common practice to give your reader not a bibliography of selected books and articles on the topic of your research paper but instead to list only those books and articles from which you quoted in your paper. The last section of your paper should therefore be entitled "Works Cited." Start a new page for the "Works Cited." Use a blank line in between citations.

    Here are some examples:

    citation of a book

    • Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Collier Books, Macmillan Publishing Co., 1980.
    • Klarer, Mario. An Introduction to Literary Studies. London and New York: Routledge, 1999.
    • Kant, Immanuel. Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime. 1764. Trans. John T. Goldstein. Berkeley: U of California P, 1960.
    • Elliott, Emory, ed. Columbia Literary History of the United States. New York: Columbia UP, 1988.
    • Hagenbüchle, Roland, and Josef Raab, eds. Negotiations of America's National Identity. Tübingen Stauffenburg Verlag, 2000.

    citation of an article, chapter, story or poem in a book collection

    • Cisneros, Sandra. "Woman Hollering Creek." Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories. 1991. New York: Vintage Books, 1992. 43-56.
    • Hagenbüchle, Roland. "Sumptuous Destitution: The Function of Desire in Emily Dickinson's Poetry." Circumference and Center: Contemporary American Poetics. Ed. Hagenbüchle. Austin: U of Texas P, 1977. 151-89.
    • Hagenbüchle, Roland. "Sumptuous Destitution: The Function of Desire in Emily Dickinson's Poetry." Circumference and Center: Contemporary American Poetics. Ed. Jacqueline Ollier. Tübingen: Stauffenburg Verlag, 1987. 151-89.
    • Hagenbüchle, Roland. "Sumptuous Destitution: The Function of Desire in Emily Dickinson's Poetry." Circumference and Center: Contemporary American Poetics. Ed. Hagenbüchle, and Jacqueline Ollier. Chicago: Chicago UP, 1997. 151-89.

    citation of an article, story or poem in a journal

    • Smith, Joseph. "Leftist Liberators: American Literary Criticism in the Thirties." Ilha do Desterro 23.1 (1990): 43-73.
    • Miller, Pete, and John Doe. "Excellent Article: All We Have to Say." Journal for Learned People 49.3 (1994): 32-40.

    citation of an internet source

    • Raab, Josef. "The Political Dimenion of Elizabeth Bishop." http://iberia.vassar.edu/bishop/Raab/html. (last visited on: 2008-05-03)
Stylistic aspects of a research paper
  1. Write primarily in the present tense. This may look unfamiliar at first because if you say, "Anne Bradstreet writes that ..." one might assume that Bradstreet is still alive. Nonetheless, her text is still present, and so we use present tense to talk about her and her work.
  2. In the body of your paper, do not give (only) general impressions but be specific. For example, don't only write "Edwards scares his audience," but tell your reader what means he uses to scare them. For example: "Edwards scares his audience through a variety of plastic images. One of these is the image of God holding people over the fiery pit of hell the way one might hold a spider over a flame."
  3. Avoid very short paragraphs. Paragraphs of one or two sentences are frequent in journalistic writing but not in literary criticism. Avoid sentence fragments. Avoid colloquialisms. Vary your sentence structure, e.g. don't start every sentence with "She writes ...," or "He observes ...," or "She notices ..." Use the passive voice rarely, if at all. Statements in the active voice are much clearer and stylistically more elegant.
  4. A paper that contains numerous grammar and spelling errors just doesn't make a good impression. Corrections in handwriting on your final typed paper are much better than no corrections at all.
Formal aspects of a research paper
  1. Use a one-and-a-half line spacing when you type your paper. On a computer, use a 12-point font.
  2. In your text as well as in your "Works Cited" list and notes, underline book titles like Othello or put them in italics (Othello). Titles of stories, poems, essays, articles, and book chapters are indicated by quotation marks.
Quotations

General

Use quotations from primary and secondary sources to illustrate your statements or to give additional support for your argument. But do not overuse quotations. Quotations should not constitute more than twenty per cent of your paper. Especially when you use longer quotations, it is not enough to just give the quotation; you also need to explain to your reader how that quotation illustrates a point you are trying to make.

Indicating the source of a quotation

Always give the page number of your quotation. This is done in brackets after closing the quotation marks. When the source of your quotation is apparent from your text, only indicate the page number; otherwise indicate both the source and the page number.

  • If your text makes it clear from which text by which author your quotation is taken, then you put only the page number of the quotation in brackets. Example: Thoreau believes that most governments are a burden. As he writes in "Civil Disobedience," he considers them to be as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" (713).
  • If it is not clear from which source your quotation is taken, you need to indicate that source either through the name of the author or through a word from the source's title or through both.
    1. The first method is used when only one text by that particular author appears in your "Works Cited."

      Example: Several Transcendentalists believe that most governments are a burden. One of them writes that governments are as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" (Thoreau 713).

    2. The second method is used when it is clear from your text who the author of the source is, while the title of the source is not clear.

      Example: Several Transcendentalists believe that most governments are a burden. Thoreau, for example, considers them to be as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" ("Civil" 713).

    3. The third method is used when neither the author nor the title of your quotation's source are apparent from your text.

      Example: Several Transcendentalists believe that most governments are a burden. One of them considers governments to be as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" (Thoreau, "Civil" 713).

Block quotations

If your quotation is longer than three lines, set it off from the rest of the text by indenting it five spaces and omit the quotations marks.

Omissions

If you leave one or more words out from your quotation, indicate this through three periods with one space in between each period.

Example: Thoreau complains that "this government never of itself furthered any enterprise, but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way.... The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished" (714).

Additions

If you add anything to your quotation, indicate this by putting the words which you are adding and which are not in the original text inside square brackets.

Example: Thoreau complains that "this government never of itself furthered any enterprise, but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way.... [Not the government but only] The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished" (714).

Poetry quotations

If you quote from a poem, indicate the end of a line in the original through a slash (i.e. /) in your quotation.

Example: Phillis Wheatley writes that "'T'was mercy brought me from my pagan land, / Taught my benighted soul to understand / That there's a God" (325).

Further information: If you have any questions about formal aspects of research papers, consult Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. New York: Modern Language Association, 1999. or take a look at any article in a recent issue of the journal Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (PMLA) and follow the format it uses. The Modern Language Association (MLA) format is the standard format for research papers in English or American literary or cultural studies. Other disciplines prefer other formats, however.

Your audience

Assume that your reader has read the primary text(s) about which you are writing. Plot summaries are therefore unnecessary. Some students of literary studies tend to give biographical introductions to the primary authors about whom they are writing. This should only be done if that biographical information is directly relevant for your thesis.

BA Advisors

Please contact the academic advisors / FachstudienberaterInnen any time you require help with organising and planning your studies in Anglistik / British and American Studies.

Current academic advisors for you:

Future Students
Degree Program

Bachelor's Degree in British and American Studies — Basic Information

The central areas for the BA programme in British and American studies are:

  • The English language and its varieties
  • Literatures and Cultures of the English-speaking world
  • English as a foreign language (EFL)
  • The perspective of British and American Studies in Bielefeld is not restricted to the United Kingdom and North America but also includes language varieties, literatures and cultures in other Anglophone countries and regions where English is used as a lingua franca, including parts of the Caribbean and Africa.

    The aim of the undergraduate programme is to qualify students in literary and linguistic analysis and interpretation, and to enhance their familiarity with English across the full spectrum of language, literature and culture with a strong emphasis on communication.
    It is important to note that British and American studies are not primarily about improving English language skills. All lectures and seminars are taught in English and all consultation with the teaching staff (emails, office hours etc.) is in English as well. The ability to read long, dense, complex scholarly and literary texts, to write academic English and to participate in seminar discussions and presentations in English is necessary for the successful completion of the BA. Although there are language courses in the basic modules, these are short and intense compared to what students have been used to at school and the aim is, in just 14 sessions, to build up advanced academic English skills on a solid foundation of good school English. Beginning students with serious language deficits will have to improve their English in self-study or take part in additional courses outside British and American studies. Being able to communicate easily in English in social or online settings is also no guarantor of success in completing a degree in British and American studies: only with serious commitment to many hours a week spent reading, doing written tasks, attending seminars and studying the seminar literature and materials can the demands of the degree be met satisfactorily.

    (Anyone who finds the foregoing paragraph difficult to understand should not attempt British and American studies until they have worked at their English skills more.)

    Phases of the study programme

    Detailed information on the FSB and the structure of the BA Anglistik in its various forms from WS 2011/2012 onwards can be found here: BA Anglistik, 2011.

    The BA programme essentially has two parts, the initial/basic phase and the advanced or profile phase. All students of English and American Studies study the basic modules.In the profile phase,students can specialise in one of the following profiles:

  • Language and Linguistics
  • British Studies
  • American Studies
  • English as a Foreign Language

  • Job perspectives

    The BA programme is targeted at all professions in which communication is central. These include but are not restricted to publishing, public relations, cultural management, media, knowledge management, etc. The profile English as a Foreign Language is targeted at teaching at school and in continuing education programmes.


    Possible combinations with other subjects

    British and American Studies can be studied either as a major or as a minor subject. In each case a second subject must also be chosen. Students who want to teach at schools need to study a second school subject. See the table of possible subjects (in German).

    Funding
    Foto Bibliothek Semesterapparat Amerikanische Ökonomie
    Bild: Norma Langohr (Ausschnitt)

    Go to our page Links + Downloads.


    FAQ

    The following are answers to frequently asked questions. They are by no means complete.

    Who can I contact if I happen to have questions on the entrance test?

    Marilyn Schapiro should be contacted to sign up for the entrance test, but only after you have read the information on the website and are confident that it makes sense for you to attempt the test. When you send your e-mail to register for the test, please include the name of your school and the date of your Abitur certificate.

    Which courses are mandatory in BM 3?

    In BM 3, you need one AILT course -either US or GB emphasis-- and you need 2 surveys GB + US . AILT is for a grade and 3 LP. One survey is for a grade and one is only for "bestanden"; both are 3LP. You can choose which Survey you want to do for a graded "Einzelleistung" and which one will be ungraded.

    In PM 1, do I have to take How to Write a Grammar?

    In PM 1, How to Write a Grammar is a required course (offered in WS)

    Do I need to take British History if I take PM 3?

    Yes

    How about American History I in PM 5?

    In PM 5, American History I is a required course (offered in WS). American History II can be replaced by another historically oriented course.

    How many courses do I need as a minor in the profile phase?

    In the "Nebenfach", you do 3 courses for 3 LP each in two connected Profile Modules: 1+2 or 3+4 etc. You also need 2 additional Profile course from any one module for 2 LP each.

    I am a major student, what do I need in the profile phase?

    In the "Kernfach" , you need two connected Profile modules (2 x 9 LP) and 2 additional Profile modules (2 x 8 LP). You also need one additional profile course from any module for 2 LP to go in your Specialisation and Research module

    How do I get emails relevant for the British and American Studies Programme?

    There is an email distribution service via the electronic course directory (EKVV). If you register in the EKVV as a student in one of the British and American Studies Programmes, you will receive all relevant emails.

    I did register as a student of British and American studies in the EKVV, but still I do not receive all emails

    We heard about problems with certain e-mail providers. Obviously they regard mails such as the English Studies Newsletter as unsolicited emails if they receive many similar emails for different addresses. You may want to consider contacting your email provider or use your university email account.

    Are all classes offered in every term?

    No, some classes are only offered in the winter term (Introduction to Linguistics, How to make a ditionary, How to write a grammar, American History I), others in the summer term (Berufliche Perspektiven für B.A.-Studierende der Anglistik, English in the Information Society)

    Answers to my specific questions and further advice

    MA
    Current Students
    Dates and Deadlines

    If you have obtained your Abitur and your Bachelor degree from a German university, please upload your application documents in the online portal (see below) by 15 September to start in the winter semester, and by 15 March to start in the summer semester.

    In well-founded cases please contact the academic counsellors after the deadline to ask whether there are still spaces open.

    Contact

    The academic counsellors for the MA are:
    Dr. Julia Andres
    Dr.  Marion Schulte

    If you have NOT obtained your school-leaving certificate and your Bachelor degree from a German university, please upload your application documents in the online portal (see below) by 15 July to start in the winter semester (1 October), and by 15 January to start in the summer semester (1 April).

    Contact

    For admission requirements see the admission information page .

    Only online applications will be considered. Please go to the application portal of the Studierendensekretariat (at Online-Bewerbung) and upload your files there. .

    Master of Arts (M.A.) British and American Studies

    NB: Information on the current Master of Arts (M.A.) British and American Studies in the new model can be found here!

    Structure (Note that the following information refers to the MA model before 2012/13; for the current MA, please follow the link above)

    The modules are part of the 4-semester course of studies, together with a section called individual supplementary study.

    structure master british and american study

    Special Features

    Throughout your studies you will be counselled and supported by your academic advisor who teaches in the field of your specialisation (British Literature and Culture, American Literature and Culture, Linguistics). Your academic advisor counsels you in your studies and ensures coherence and successful specialisation in your studies. Moreover, he or she is available for more general questions and advice.

    General information and applications, contact:
    Dr. Julia Andres
    Dr.  Marion Schulte
    Additional Information
    If you have questions concerning deadlines, forms or finances, please see Links + Downloads. This is the official "Module Handbook" for the MA (in German). MA British and American Studies Modulhandbuch
    Master of Education (M.Ed.)

    The Master of Education supplements a prior BA with a major in another subject in order to teach English as a foreign language in the German school system. The study programme consists of classes taken from the Bachelor curriculum according to the study regulations.

    Please find general information on the Master of Education programme at Bielefeld University as well as on application procedures:

    If you have questions on deadlines, financings and forms, please see Links + Downloads.

    Regulations

    'FsB' is the abbreviation for Fächerspezifische Bestimmungen. FsB are the rules which you follow in your studies.

    FsB passed on 25. Oktober 2007.
    These regulations are valid for all students who started their Bachelor degree in British and American Studies in the winter semester 2004/2005 or later. Students who took up their studies earlier and wish to switch to the 'new' FsB can do so by applying to the central examination office of the department (Lili).
    FsB passed on 1 July 2005.
    These regulations are relevant for all students enrolling before the winter term 20007/2008 for the master programme in British and American Studies at Bielefeld University and who graduate before the end of the winter term 2009/2010.
    FsB passed on 1 February 2013.
    These regulations are valid for all students who started their Bachelor degree in British and American Studies in the winter semester 2012/2013 or later. Students who took up their studies earlier and wish to switch to the 'new' FsB can do so by applying to the central examination office of the department (LiLi). You are advised to consult Dr. Julia Andres or Dr. Marion Schulte, the study advisors of the programme, first:
    Dr. Julia Andres
    Dr.  Marion Schulte

    Important Weblinks

    Go to our page Links + Downloads

    Plagiarism

    What is plagiarism?
    Plagiarism is using someone else's intellectual property and pretending it is your own; it is regarded as an extremely serious offence in any academic community
    .

    For examples please see the following website, under the section "Writing":
    http://www.uefap.com/writing/writfram.htm
    (link used with kind permission of Andy Gillett).

    In this Department, we regard copying and pasting from Internet sources or copying down passages from books as unfair and unethical. It is equally unethical to hand in a paper which you have bought from a website or paid someone to write for you, or to present work that a friend or relative has written for you as if it were your own. Consistently failing to state that you are quoting from other writers or using their ideas in a paper constitutes intellectual theft as well. We will take appropriate action if we discover that plagiarism has been committed; in extremely serious cases, this could result in expulsion from the university.

    Term Papers
    Languages and Linguistics

    You are planning to write a Hausarbeit in one of the Linguistics courses this term? The linguistics teachers will give you as much support as possible. Here are some hints on what to expect from us and what we expect from you.

    Structure

    Title page

    See Styles section.

    Table of Contents

    with section numbers, subsection numbers, page numbers (by the way - your term paper is not a book, so it contains Sections and Subsections, not Chapters)

    Introduction

    The introduction contains your motivation for dealing with the topic. State your goal in relation to the problem, give plausible examples and a brief outline of the paper.

    Theoretical part

    A linguistic paper is, in informal terms, about 50% "theory" and 50% "practice" (see "Empirical part" below). The theoretical part gives the background of the paper, an accurate formulation of the problem and appropriate methods for solving it, contains a discussion of the research that has already been done on the topic and presents these results accurately and systematically. It ends with a formulation of your working hypothesis.

    Empirical part

    First, you describe your data collection and analysis (Participants, Method, Analysis), then you present your results.

    Discussion and Conclusion

    In the discussion you give a summary of your results and relate them to the goals discussed in the Introduction and to the findings discussed in the theoretical part. Discuss problems which occurred and open questions which remain. Finally, possible applications of the results can be mentioned. You may also wish to give an outlook on further developments.

    References

    In the references you list all works cited in your paper according to the styles listed below.

    Appendix

    You may have extensive corpus data, tables of results, and so on. These belong in an appendix. For some kinds of paper you may also wish to include a floppy disk or a CD-ROM.

    Remember that the basic function of any linguistics paper is to persuade the scientific community of the relevance, value and innovative value of your results. In principle, this also applies to your term paper.

    Styles

    The main point to remember is that formatting styles are intended to help your reader to read the paper as easily as possible and concentrate on what you are saying (which is obviously in your own interest, too).

    Please make sure you follow these conventions in your paper. You will find standard examples of how to format a linguistics paper in linguistic periodicals such as Journal of Linguistics, Language in Society, Linguistics.

    Format your paper neatly with a standard formatting system such as OpenOffice, Word or LaTeX, using appropriately defined document styles (e.g. Heading 1, Heading 2, ...) and text objects (lists and tables instead of tabs).

    Titlepage

    Tables and Graphs

    in the text are numbered and contain some explanation. Example: Table 4. Number of students taking linguistics exams from 1980 to 1999. Table captions are given above the table, graph captions below the graph.

    References in the text ...

    ? are given in short form (author's name, year of publication:page) and NOT with a footnote Example: As Muller (1995:322) pointed out ... Distinguish clearly between what you find in the literature and your own contribution.

    References in the bibliography ...

    have the following style

    • articles:

      Author's surname, initial. (Year). "Titel of article". Name of Journal Number of Issue, page numbers. Example: Smith, J. (1965). "What's new in linguistics?" Journal of Linguistics 4, 324-335.

    • articles in books:

      Author's surname, initial. (Year). "Titel of article". In: Editor's initials, surname (ed), Title of book, place: publisher, pp. page numbers. Example: Smith, J. (1985). "What's new in linguistics?" In: D. Lightfoot (ed.), New horizons in linguistics, London: London University Press, pp. 103-107.

    • books:

      Author's surname, initial. (Year). Title of book. Place: Publisher. Example: Muller, G. (1998). What I like about linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Language

    Scientific English is quite a different register from spoken English. Please make sure you use appropriate expressions and vocabulary. Avoid first and second person pronouns - you are not writing to a pen-friend or expressing a simple opinion but carefully formulating results which are intended to be more generally valid.

    Example
    instead of writing "And then I looked at how long the vowel /a/ is before the /r/" write something along the lines of "Subsequently, the length of the vowel /a/ preceding an /r/ was measured". Again, check linguistic papers in Journals to get a feeling for the style!

    Writing stages

    Writing a linguistic paper involves the following steps:

    1. Planning and finding of topic

      First of all you need to find a topic. Please don't expect us to give you a topic because you yourself know best where your interests lie. In order to find a topic re-read the course materials and ask yourself the following questions:

      • What is especially interesting about the topic of the course?
      • Which part is most fascinating for me?
      • Which parts raises the most questions for me?
      • Which is the main question I would like to discuss in my paper?

      After you have found your topic please come to our office hour. We'll help you with the next stage of reading and cutting down your topic and data collection.

    2. Reading and cutting down your topic

      When you have found a topic for your paper read what has been written about the topic so far. We will suggest literature to you if you like. We will also help you to formulate your topic precisely, i.e. decide which aspects you should discuss and which you might leave out. You will then have the central question/hypothesis of your paper.

    3. Collecting data

      Your hypothesis determines what kind of data you should collect. We will help you with the technical aspects if you like.

    4. First version

      Next you write a first version of your paper according to the structure and styles outlined here. You can hand in parts of the first version for feedback if you want.

    5. Revision
      • Even if you did not hand in the first version you will have to revise your paper. You will probably notice flaws in your argumentation, gaps or other things that need to be revised.
      • Also check your spelling please! It is a good idea to give a version to a friend because they will notice more and other things than you yourself.
      • Another good idea is to read what you have written aloud to someone else. Then you will notice awkward formulations and other kinds of errors and understand better how to structure your writing and get new ideas.
      • Double check your bibliographical references!
    6. Submission

      Only after revision submit your paper and have a rest.

    Support

    Writing a Hausarbeit is a skill that needs to be learned. Hausarbeiten are your chance to practice writing before you write your Masters thesis or Staatsexamensarbeit, which will determine much of your final grade. So please make use of the support we offer for writing Hausarbeiten. In detail we will help you with

    • reading suggestions and cutting down your topic/hypothesis
    • suggestions for data collection and analysis
    • feedback for (parts of) the first version
    • feedback and grade for the final version
    If you experience trouble at any stage please come and see us or contact us by email.

    Furthermore, the Schreiblabor regularly offers courses and advice.

    Email: schreiblabor@uni-bielefeld.de

    Grades

    As a general principle

    Grade 3 means you have followed the following instructions and got the facts right,

    Grade 2 means you have done this and succeeded in placing the question you deal with in its scientific context,

    Grade 1 means you have done all this and contributed your own constructive criticism and new ideas on the subject.

    In particular we mark the following aspects

    Clarity of structure and expression We expect logical argumentation, precise discussion and a clearly structured paper. Please check this in your revision!

    Scientific treatment of topic We expect a correct account of the facts and an awareness of their relevance to the field.

    Your own ideas We mark the originality of your ideas and your discussion and presentation of your results and the literature you read.

    Presentation We expect a formally correct clear presentation according to the styles outlined above.

    We will discuss your grade with you in detail and give you suggestions on how (if) your next papers can be improved.

    Literary and Cultural Studies
    How to Write a Literary Studies Term Paper or Thesis
    The purpose of a research paper in literary criticism or literary theory ...

    is to convince your reader of your opinion on one or more particular texts, authors, movements, periods, theories etc. The opinion or argument that you prove in a research paper is called your thesis. This thesis is usually presented at the end of your introduction.

    It should consist of a fairly specific and precise announcement. A statement like "In the speeches of John Winthrop and Jonathan Edwards there are many similarities but also differences" is too vague. A better thesis would be: "While John Winthrop's speeches use religious doctrines to defend a democratic social model, Jonathan Edwards employs Scripture primarily to promote a strongly religious behavior among his listeners."

    Before you start writing the paper
    1. Read the primary text(s). While you read the text(s), mark passages that you could later quote.
    2. Think of a thesis for your paper and make an outline for how you are going to prove that your thesis is true.
    3. Using bibliographies and other research tools, find secondary material on your topic. Do not use secondary sources as any kind of "ultimate" or "absolute" truth, though. Instead, evaluate them critically. In your research paper you may argue that a critic is right about a particular point or that he/she is wrong about a particular point. Be aware that internet sources are often limited in their accuracy or usefulness. ALWAYS CONSULT THE MLA INTERNATIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY (available in electronic form at the library computer terminals under (Datenbanken). Materials not available at Bielefeld can be ordered through inter-library loan (Fernleihe).
    Parts of a research paper

    Research papers generally consist of: - title page, - table of contents, - main text, - notes, - works cited.

    1. Title page

      Other than the title of your paper, its first page should also contain the name of the university, the seminar title, the name of the professor or instructor, the semester, and your own name.

    2. Table of contents

      The title page is followed by a (detailed) table of contents. Use either the outline format A.I.1.a. or 1.1.1.1. For each section of your paper, the table of contents lists the page number on which that section starts. Title page and table of contents should not be counted in your page numbering..

    3. Main text

      The three main parts of a research paper's main text are:

      1. Introduction (with the paper's thesis)
      2. Body (containing support or proof for the thesis) and
      3. Conclusion (summing up results, mentioning what aspects you were unable to address in more detail, or pointing the way for further research on this or a related topic)
      The body of your paper is by far the longest part.

    4. Notes

      You may use footnotes or endnotes. If you use endnotes, start a "Notes" section on a new page after the conclusion of your paper. Use notes sparingly. The main purpose of notes is to give related information that would be distracting in the paper's main text. Notes are also often used to critically evaluate secondary sources.

    5. Works cited

      It is now common practice to give your reader not a bibliography of selected books and articles on the topic of your research paper but instead to list only those books and articles from which you quoted in your paper. The last section of your paper should therefore be entitled "Works Cited." Start a new page for the "Works Cited." Use a blank line in between citations.

      Here are some examples:

      citation of a book

      • Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Collier Books, Macmillan Publishing Co., 1980.
      • Klarer, Mario. An Introduction to Literary Studies. London and New York: Routledge, 1999.
      • Kant, Immanuel. Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime. 1764. Trans. John T. Goldstein. Berkeley: U of California P, 1960.
      • Elliott, Emory, ed. Columbia Literary History of the United States. New York: Columbia UP, 1988.
      • Hagenbüchle, Roland, and Josef Raab, eds. Negotiations of America's National Identity. Tübingen Stauffenburg Verlag, 2000.

      citation of an article, chapter, story or poem in a book collection

      • Cisneros, Sandra. "Woman Hollering Creek." Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories. 1991. New York: Vintage Books, 1992. 43-56.
      • Hagenbüchle, Roland. "Sumptuous Destitution: The Function of Desire in Emily Dickinson's Poetry." Circumference and Center: Contemporary American Poetics. Ed. Hagenbüchle. Austin: U of Texas P, 1977. 151-89.
      • Hagenbüchle, Roland. "Sumptuous Destitution: The Function of Desire in Emily Dickinson's Poetry." Circumference and Center: Contemporary American Poetics. Ed. Jacqueline Ollier. Tübingen: Stauffenburg Verlag, 1987. 151-89.
      • Hagenbüchle, Roland. "Sumptuous Destitution: The Function of Desire in Emily Dickinson's Poetry." Circumference and Center: Contemporary American Poetics. Ed. Hagenbüchle, and Jacqueline Ollier. Chicago: Chicago UP, 1997. 151-89.

      citation of an article, story or poem in a journal

      • Smith, Joseph. "Leftist Liberators: American Literary Criticism in the Thirties." Ilha do Desterro 23.1 (1990): 43-73.
      • Miller, Pete, and John Doe. "Excellent Article: All We Have to Say." Journal for Learned People 49.3 (1994): 32-40.

      citation of an internet source

      • Raab, Josef. "The Political Dimenion of Elizabeth Bishop." http://iberia.vassar.edu/bishop/Raab/html. (last visited on: 2008-05-03)
    Stylistic aspects of a research paper
    1. Write primarily in the present tense. This may look unfamiliar at first because if you say, "Anne Bradstreet writes that ..." one might assume that Bradstreet is still alive. Nonetheless, her text is still present, and so we use present tense to talk about her and her work.
    2. In the body of your paper, do not give (only) general impressions but be specific. For example, don't only write "Edwards scares his audience," but tell your reader what means he uses to scare them. For example: "Edwards scares his audience through a variety of plastic images. One of these is the image of God holding people over the fiery pit of hell the way one might hold a spider over a flame."
    3. Avoid very short paragraphs. Paragraphs of one or two sentences are frequent in journalistic writing but not in literary criticism. Avoid sentence fragments. Avoid colloquialisms. Vary your sentence structure, e.g. don't start every sentence with "She writes ...," or "He observes ...," or "She notices ..." Use the passive voice rarely, if at all. Statements in the active voice are much clearer and stylistically more elegant.
    4. A paper that contains numerous grammar and spelling errors just doesn't make a good impression. Corrections in handwriting on your final typed paper are much better than no corrections at all.
    Formal aspects of a research paper
    1. Use a one-and-a-half line spacing when you type your paper. On a computer, use a 12-point font.
    2. In your text as well as in your "Works Cited" list and notes, underline book titles like Othello or put them in italics (Othello). Titles of stories, poems, essays, articles, and book chapters are indicated by quotation marks.
    Quotations

    General

    Use quotations from primary and secondary sources to illustrate your statements or to give additional support for your argument. But do not overuse quotations. Quotations should not constitute more than twenty per cent of your paper. Especially when you use longer quotations, it is not enough to just give the quotation; you also need to explain to your reader how that quotation illustrates a point you are trying to make.

    Indicating the source of a quotation

    Always give the page number of your quotation. This is done in brackets after closing the quotation marks. When the source of your quotation is apparent from your text, only indicate the page number; otherwise indicate both the source and the page number.

    • If your text makes it clear from which text by which author your quotation is taken, then you put only the page number of the quotation in brackets. Example: Thoreau believes that most governments are a burden. As he writes in "Civil Disobedience," he considers them to be as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" (713).
    • If it is not clear from which source your quotation is taken, you need to indicate that source either through the name of the author or through a word from the source's title or through both.
      1. The first method is used when only one text by that particular author appears in your "Works Cited."

        Example: Several Transcendentalists believe that most governments are a burden. One of them writes that governments are as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" (Thoreau 713).

      2. The second method is used when it is clear from your text who the author of the source is, while the title of the source is not clear.

        Example: Several Transcendentalists believe that most governments are a burden. Thoreau, for example, considers them to be as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" ("Civil" 713).

      3. The third method is used when neither the author nor the title of your quotation's source are apparent from your text.

        Example: Several Transcendentalists believe that most governments are a burden. One of them considers governments to be as useless as "a sort of wooden gun" (Thoreau, "Civil" 713).

    Block quotations

    If your quotation is longer than three lines, set it off from the rest of the text by indenting it five spaces and omit the quotations marks.

    Omissions

    If you leave one or more words out from your quotation, indicate this through three periods with one space in between each period.

    Example: Thoreau complains that "this government never of itself furthered any enterprise, but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way.... The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished" (714).

    Additions

    If you add anything to your quotation, indicate this by putting the words which you are adding and which are not in the original text inside square brackets.

    Example: Thoreau complains that "this government never of itself furthered any enterprise, but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way.... [Not the government but only] The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished" (714).

    Poetry quotations

    If you quote from a poem, indicate the end of a line in the original through a slash (i.e. /) in your quotation.

    Example: Phillis Wheatley writes that "'T'was mercy brought me from my pagan land, / Taught my benighted soul to understand / That there's a God" (325).

    Further information: If you have any questions about formal aspects of research papers, consult Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. New York: Modern Language Association, 1999. or take a look at any article in a recent issue of the journal Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (PMLA) and follow the format it uses. The Modern Language Association (MLA) format is the standard format for research papers in English or American literary or cultural studies. Other disciplines prefer other formats, however.

    Your audience

    Assume that your reader has read the primary text(s) about which you are writing. Plot summaries are therefore unnecessary. Some students of literary studies tend to give biographical introductions to the primary authors about whom they are writing. This should only be done if that biographical information is directly relevant for your thesis.

    MA Advisors

    Academic Advisor - Master of Education


    Herr Brian Rozema

    Academic Advisors - Master of Arts

    Please contact the student counsellors / Fachstudienberaterinnen any time you require help with organising and planning your studies in Anglistik / British and American Studies. They are

    Dr. Julia Andres
    and
    Dr.  Marion Schulte
    Future Students
    Degree Program

    Master's programme British and American Studies

    At Bielefeld University we offer two separate Master's programmes in British and American Studies, namely the Master of Arts and the Master of Education. The Master of Education is targeted at prospective teachers, especially those who already have a BA in their other school subject. The Master of Arts is the programme providing a specialisation outside of the school context.

    Master of Arts (British and American Studies)

    Basic Information

    The Master's programme in British and American studies is a two year programme intended for students with a background in British and American Studies. The focus of the M.A. British and American Studies programme is on intercultural knowledge and skills and on academic and research skills. It centres around

    • the English language and its varieties
    • the forms of literatures in English
    • media such as films, newspapers, radio, the internet, etc.
    • English language cultures and their histories.

    Within this spectrum, the Master of Arts programme British and American studies specialises in transculturation. Transculturation refers to processes of cultural exchange and intercultural phenomena. Classes are conducted in English.

    More information on the Master of Arts in English and American Studies

    Master of Education (British and American Studies)

    Basic Information

    The Master of Education programme in British and American studies is intended for students with a bachelor's degree in British and American Studies as minor subject or with another teaching subject as a major together with a minor in Education (Erziehungswissenschaft). The focus of the M.Ed. British and American Studies programme is on Teaching English as a Foreign Language. The degree is a prerequisite for admission to training as a teacher in a state school.

    Master of Arts: InterAmerican Studies

    Bielefeld British and American Studies cooperates with the interdisciplinary programme in InterAmerican Studies. For more information see the Interamerican Studies webpages.

    Applications and Deadlines

    Master of Arts: British and American Studies

    Admission to the MA British and American Studies programme is based on an online application consisting of:

    • an undergraduate university degree certificate (minimum 6 semesters; grade 2,5 or above),
    • a Letter of Motivation in English,
    • a 15-page sample essay in English
    • a curriculum vitae / resumé
    • evidence of basic knowledge of German (Test DaF 3/3/3/3 or DSH-1, or other formal, documented proof of German skills at B1 level on the in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages from a recognized test provider)
    • evidence of proficiency in English (IELTS 7.0 or TOEFL [computer-based: 230 or above; paper-based: 570 or above] or Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English)

    In case you have not yet received your Bachelor certificate, you can also apply with a transcript of your records (i.e. a summary of your preliminary results). If your certificate is acceptable you will then be admitted on the grounds that you submit your certificate as soon as you have received it.

    The letter of motivation should describe your reasons for wishing to study the Master of Arts British and American studies. Please also indicate whether your interest is mainly in British literature and culture, American literature and culture, or linguistics. We will help select an academic advisor for you accordingly.

    The sample essay gives the Admissions Committee an impression of the quality of your academic work and achievements in the field of British and American studies. It could, for example, be the first 15 pages of your BA thesis.

    On the basis of the applications received by the deadline the admissions committee will decide on the suitability of individual applicants according to a point system. Only online applications will be considered. Please go to the application portal of the Studierendensekretariat (http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/(en)/Universitaet/Studium/Studierendensekretariat/Bewerbung/Online-Bewerbung.html) and upload your files there.

    More information is available at:

    Links + Downloads

    Master of Education: British and American Studies

    A condition for being admitted to the Master of Education programme at Bielefeld University is the participation in a mandatory Interview and an adequate first degree. Adequate first degrees here means:

    • Graduates of a BA programme a Bielefeld University in a subject that is accepted for teacher training with an appropriate profile. If no appropriate profile was selected, additional classes may be required during the master phase.
    • Graduates of a university with at least a six semester programme, which includes in principle a subject that is to be taught at school or the science of education plus major parts of a subject taught at school. See Externe for more information for students who are not graduates of Bielefeld University.
    Special requirements for British and American Studies

    Necessary for enrolling into British and American Studies is a proof of adequate language knowledge.

    Foreign language skills

    For a master for primary school or schools ranging up to the 10th grade (GHR), no additional language skills are required. Prospective teachers for the German Gymnasium or Gesamtschule need to provide the Latin certificate (Latinum).

    Missing requirements should be fullfilled before the start of the master phase. The latest possible time is the first half of the master phase.

    Additional links can be found at:

    Links + Downloads

    Funding
    Foto Bibliothek Semesterapparat Amerikanische Ökonomie
    Bild: Norma Langohr (Ausschnitt)

    Go to our page Links + Downloads.


    Doctoral Program
    Ph.D.

    British and American Studies Section at Bielefeld University

    In the British and American Studies section at Bielefeld University, students can earn a Ph.D. (Dr. phil.) degree. This academic qualification is based on individual creative research conducted under the supervision of one of the senior lecturers, primarily one of our professors. Ph.D. research can be conducted in all areas in which those lecturers have research interests. Additionally, students may freely choose from university courses that are relevant to their needs. For more information on earning a Ph.D. at Bielefeld University, students are advised to contact Dr. Angela Stock (academic advisor) or one of our professors.

    For PhD students in American and Inter-American studies, there is the International Postgraduate Forum (IPF), which is based in the American Studies section and represents a network of and for doctoral students working in the fields of American and Inter-American Studies (associated universities include: the Clinton Institute for American Studies in Dublin, University College Cork, University of Siegen, University of Duisburg-Essen). The Forum organises international conferences, workshops and web-networking.

    Contact Person

    Contact Prof. Raussert for details.

    email: wilfried.raussert@uni-bielefeld.de

    Going Abroad

    The English Section at Bielefeld University strongly encourages its students to spend time abroad in English-speaking countries in order for them to acquire cultural awareness and language skills at first hand. Our staff is committed to helping students find opportunities for stays in English-speaking countries by, for example, writing letters of recommendation, coordinating exchange programmes, making themselves available as referees for exceptional students, or recognizing credit points obtained at universities where English is the medium of instruction.

    Students who started their studies after 2011 and are planning to become teachers have to complete the modules Internationalization or, in exceptional circumstances, Internationalization at Home. Students who began their studies after 2011 and who are not going into the teaching profession must complete the Praxisstudien module, ideally by gaining experience relevant to their future careers in an English-speaking country or environment.

    Follow the links to learn more about these options:

    Praxis Semester

    Diese Seite ist nicht rechtlich verbindlich und unterliegt ständigen Veränderungen.

    Konzeption und Intention

    Das Praxissemester ist eingebettet in ein sogenanntes berufsfeldbezogenes Semester, welches einen Schulforschungsteil und einen schulpraktischen Teil umfasst. In dem Praxissemester vorausgehenden Semester werden die Studierenden durch universitäre Veranstaltungen der Fachdidaktik (Modul: "Vorbereitung und Reflexion des Praxissemesters" (Grundschule)/ "Vorbereitung und Reflexion des Praxissemesters" (GymGe) im Fach Anglistik auf die Anforderungen, die von Seiten der Anglistik vorgesehen sind, vorbereitet. Für das Praxissemester selbst ist eine produktive wechselseitige Verbindung zwischen dem universitären Fach Anglistik, ZfsL und der Schule vorgesehen. Dabei wird der Ansatz des Forschenden Lernens im Bereich der Anglistik sowohl auf den Schulforschungsteil als auch auf den schulpraktischen Teil bezogen. Für allgemeine Informationen zum Praxissemester von der BiSEd (Inklusive Termine und Fristen)

    Zeitliche Rahmenbedingungen

    Terminübersicht Schulen für das Praxissemester
    Grundsätzlich müssen die Studierenden während des Praxissemesters die durch den Kalender vorgegebenen Gegebenheiten in der Universität, besonders aber auch in der Schule, beachten. Vor allem das Praxissemester von Februar bis Juli ist, bedingt durch viele Feiertage und möglicherweise eine Überschneidung mit den Sommerferien, für die Studierenden kürzer als das von September bis Februar.

    15. September bis 15. Februar 15. Februar bis 15. Juli
    Universität
    • 15 Wochen Semester, ca. von Mitte Oktober bis Anfang Februar
    • 2 Wochen Weihnachtspause
    • 2 Feiertage: Tag der dt. Einheit, Allerheiligen
    • 15 Wochen Semester, ca. von Anfang April bis Mitte Juli
    • 4 Feiertage: 1. Mai, Fronleichnam, Christi Himmelfahrt, Pfingsten
    Schule
    • 5 Monate Schulzeit
    • Davon 2 Wochen Herbstferien und 2 Wochen Winterferien
    • 2 Feiertage: Tag der dt. Einheit, Allerheiligen
    • Ggf. bewegliche Ferientage: Karneval, zusätzlicher Tag zum 03.10. oder 1.11.
    • Zeugnisausgabe Ende Januar bis Mitte Februar
    • 5 Monate Schulzeit
    • 2 Wochen Osterferien
    • Gegebenenfalls Beginn der Sommerferien vor Ende des Praxissemesters Mitte Juli
    • 4 Feiertage: 1. Mai, Fronleichnam, Christi Himmelfahrt, Pfingsten
    • Höchstwahrscheinlich weitere bewegliche Ferientage zu Karneval, 1. Mai, Fronleichnam, Christi Himmelfahrt, Pfingsten
    • Zeugnisausgabe und Versetzungskonferenzen zum Ende des Schuljahres

    Studienprojekte

    Im Schulforschungsteil erforschen die Studierenden ausgewählte Aspekte der schulischen Praxis im Rahmen von Studienprojekten. Das Studienprojekt im Fach Anglistik kann sich dabei sowohl auf unterrichtliche als auch auf außerunterrichtliche Aspekte beziehen. Thema und konkrete Ausgestaltung des Studienprojektes richtet sich nach der jeweiligen Situation an der Praktikumsschule.

    Allgemeine Regelungen für das Fach Anglistik

    Für die Studienprojekte im Fach Anglistik gelten folgende Regelungen:

    • Es kann eins der zwei Studienprojekte im Fach Anglistik durchgeführt werden.
    • Innerhalb von Variante 1 können fächerverbindende Studienprojekte durchgeführt werden, insbesondere zum Thema "bilingualer Unterricht" in Verbindung mit bilingual unterrichtbaren Fächern, wie z.B. Geschichte, Sport, Biologie, Sozialwissenschaft, usw.
    • Falls ein fächerverbindendes Studienprojekt gewählt wird, muss dieses sowohl im Umfang als auch im Grad der Ausarbeitung dem Workload von zwei einzelfachbezogenen Studienprojekten entsprechen. Außerdem muss dies mit den Dozenten beider Fächer abgesprochen werden.
    • Jede der unten genannten Varianten 1-5 kann gewählt werden, wobei die Studierenden beachten müssen, dass sich mindestens eins der beiden Studienprojekte auf eines der Unterrichtsvorhaben dieses Faches beziehen sollte (Variante 1).
    • Im Fach Anglistik können Studienprojekte sowohl in Einzel- als auch in Partnerarbeit durchgeführt werden. Hier sollte darauf geachtet werden, dass die einzelnen Leistungen der Studierenden entsprechend gekennzeichnet und gewürdigt werden und der Umfang entsprechend größer ist. Dies muss mit dem/der DozentIn des Vorbereitungs- und Begleitseminars abgesprochen werden.
    • Die Teilnahme an Peer Learning Activities (PLAs, wie z.B. Peer-Hospitation, team-teaching mit Peers, gemeinsame Aktivitäten planen, Materialaustausch, etc.) ist innerhalb der Studienprojekte vorgesehen, sowohl wenn diese in Einzel- als auch wenn diese in Partnerarbeit erbracht werden.
    • Es können bereits vorhandene Daten (z.B. von Lernstandserhebungen oder auch von statistischen Analysen) genutzt werden.

    Varianten für Studienprojekte im Fach Anglistik

    Es gibt fünf Varianten für die Studienprojekte:

    Variante 1: Forschung über die eigene unterrichtspraktische Tätigkeit
    Forschungsgegenstand sind ausgewählte Aspekte des eigenen Englischunterrichts; beispielsweise die Erforschung von verschiedenen Umgehensweisen mit schweigenden SchülerInnen (z.B. im Umgang mit silent period oder mit foreign language anxiety), die fachdidaktische Reduktion (z.B. modified Input) oder die fremdsprachenspezifische Aufbereitung des Stoffes (z.B. modification of authentic texts und realia). Auch Fragen zum Lernfortschritt einer Klasse (z.B. language development) oder methodische Fragestellungen (z.B. Einsatz von real-world Tasks) können Gegenstand der Forschung sein.

    Variante 2: Forschung in fremdem Unterricht
    Grundsätzlich gilt, dass jegliche Forschung in fremdem Unterricht der uneingeschränkten Zustimmung der Lehrkraft bedarf und ausführlich mit dieser besprochen werden muss. Es ist nicht Ziel dieser Variante, fremden Unterricht zu bewerten, sondern fremden Unterricht mit einem kompetenzorientierten Blick zu erforschen. Forschung in fremdem Unterricht ist nicht unbedingt Unterricht der Englischlehrkraft oder Mentorin, sondern kann auch Unterricht von ReferendarInnen oder anderen Praxissemesterstudierenden sein. Ethische Aspekte von Forschung und das Bewusstsein über die Rolle der Studierenden sind hier von großer Bedeutung. Vorteil dieser Variante ist, dass sich die Studierenden, ohne gleichzeitig unterrichten zu müssen, zunächst auf Untersuchungsfrage und -methode konzentrieren können. Somit können sie sich in einem ersten Schritt auch besser in die für den Forschungsprozess notwendige Distanznahme einüben und wahrscheinlich leichter einen objektiven Blick auf das unterrichtspraktische Handeln einnehmen. Beispielsweise können Themen wie wait time, error feedback, teacher questions, patterns of interaction oder use of L1 and L2 erforscht werden
    (A framework for EFL classroom observations - Devos, 2014).

    Variante 3: Forschung in Schulentwicklungsprozessen
    Hierbei kann es zum Beispiel um Teamentwicklungsprozesse, um das Schulprogramm, um spezifische Qualitätszirkel oder um Maßnahmen zur Unterrichtsentwicklung (in Bezug auf das Fach Englisch z.B. die Implementierung bilingualer Module und Inklusion ) gehen. Die Studierenden könnten dabei bis zu einem gewissen Grad auch in konkrete Schulentwicklungsprozesse an ihrer Praktikumsschule eingebunden sein, für die sie bspw. Evaluationsaufgaben übernehmen (z.B. Befragungen der SchülerInnen zur Umsetzung von mündlichen Prüfungen anstelle von Klassenarbeiten, um die mündlichen Sprachproduktion zu testen).

    Variante 4: Einzelfallarbeit zu Diagnose und Förderung
    Der Schwerpunkt liegt auf der Diagnostik und individueller Förderung im Fach Englisch. Einerseits kann mit Hilfe bewährter diagnostischer Instrumente der spezifische Förderbedarf bestimmt werden. Anhand dieser Ergebnisse werden die Maßnahmen für die Förderung ausgewählt. Sowohl die Ergebnisse der Anfangs- und der weiteren diagnostischen Verfahren als auch der Verlauf der individuellen Förderung werden zusammen mit einer allgemeinen Fallbeschreibung dokumentiert. Andererseits kann aber auch ein gezieltes, diagnostisches Instrument von Seiten der Studierenden entwickelt werden, um somit gezielt den Leistungsstand eines Schülers oder einer Schülerin feststellen zu können. Ein solches Projekt würde sich auf die detaillierte Feststellung des Leistungsstandes (z.B. im Teilbereich Hörverstehen) eines Kindes anhand der Konzipierung eines zielführenden diagnostischen Instruments konzentrieren, um so den Förderbedarf in genau diesem Bereich festzustellen.

    Variante 5: Forschende Auseinandersetzung mit biographischen Zugängen und/ oder eigenem Professionalisierungsprozess
    Diese Variante ist stärker als die Vorhergehenden auf selbstreflexive, biographische Prozesse ausgerichtet. Auf diese wird in der Reflexion besonderes Gewicht gelegt. Solche Projekte müssten zur Unterstützung des Professionalisierungsprozesses der Studierenden mit unterschiedlichen methodischen Ansätzen transparent gemacht werden, so dass sie als Grundlage für kritisches Hinterfragen, Reflexion und Weiterentwicklung dienen können. In dieser Variante ist im Sinne der PLAs eine Tandembildung erwünscht. Beispielsweise könnte erforscht werden, inwiefern die eigene Motivation in Bezug auf Fremdsprachenlernen die Art und Weise beeinflusst, in der man die SchülerInnen motiviert.

    Umfang der Studienprojekte

    Der Umfang der schriftlichen Ausarbeitung beträgt ca. 10-15 Seiten. Alternativ kann auch eine schriftliche Ausarbeitung von 8-10 Seiten geschrieben werden, die dann von einer mündlichen Präsentation ergänzt wird. Einzelheiten werden mit dem/der DozentIn des Begleitseminars besprochen. In Bezug auf den Ausarbeitungsgrad erwarten wir, dass die Ausarbeitung den Anforderungen einer wissenschaftlichen, empirischen Studie genügt. Im Fach Anglistik muss diese in englischer Sprache verfasst werden.

    Unterrichtsvorhaben

    Im Praxissemester nimmt der Lernort Schule eine zentrale Stellung ein, denn hier geht es unter anderem um das Sammeln von Unterrichtserfahrungen. Während des Praxissemesters findet dies gleichmäßig auf alle studierten Fächer verteilt statt. Insbesondere planen, unterrichten und reflektieren die Studierenden verschiedene Unterrichtsvorhaben, wobei das Prinzip des Forschenden Lernens auch hier besondere Berücksichtigung findet. Außerdem soll das eigene Unterrichten durch eine "schrittweise Progression" stattfinden. Das heißt, dass die Studierenden Unterrichtserfahrungen progressiv von Hospitation über das Unterrichten von Teilstunden bis ggf. zur Übernahme einer ganzen Stunde in eigener Verantwortung erwerben sollen.

    Unterrichtsskizze für eine Englischstunde

    Unterrichtsskizzen dienen auch als Vorlage für die von den Studierenden anzufertigende Unterrichtsskizze zum Beratungsbesuch. Im Rahmen des Praxissemesters besteht, im Einvernehmen aller Beteiligten (insbesondere unter Vorbehalt der Zustimmung der Lehrperson an der Schule), die Option, die Unterrichtskizze entweder auf Deutsch oder auf Englisch zu verfassen. Sie sollte maximal zwei Seiten lang sein.

    Beispiel für die sinnvolle Verknüpfung von Studienprojekt und Unterrichtsvorhaben (Grundschule)

    Thema des Studienprojekts: Error correction in the Primary EFL classroom

    Mögliche Forschungsfrage: What types of oral corrective Feedback do I use when teaching English as a foreign language to a 3rd grade?
    Rahmenbedingungen:
    Dieses Studienprojekt ist nicht unbedingt auf nur eine Klasse beschränkt. Es kann, wie in der Frage beschrieben, der eigene Unterricht in nur einer (z.B. dritten) Klasse erforscht werden. Es ist aber auch denkbar, sich selbst in mehreren dritten Klassen parallel zu beobachten (wenn man z.B. ohnehin in mehreren parallelen Klassen das gleiche Thema unterrichtet). Darüber hinaus kann man auch vergleichen, ob es Unterschiede in der mündlichen Fehlerkorrektur gibt, zum Beispiel in einer höheren Klasse (z.B. Klasse 4) und einer Klasse der Schuleingangsphase (z.B. Klasse 2). Darüber hinaus können verschiedene weitere Aspekte in den Blick genommen werden, wie zum Beispiel das "Uptake" von Seiten der Lernenden oder auch eine Kontrastisierung zwischen tatsächlicher Korrektur durch die Lehrperson und gewünschter Korrektur von Seiten der SchülerInnen. Bei diesem Studienprojekt sollte prinzipiell beachtet werden, dass die Rahmenbedingungen so gestaltet sein müssen, dass der Unterricht ein hohes Maß an mündlicher Kommunikation zulässt und ausreichend Sprechanlässe für SchülerInnen bietet. Das Erheben der Daten erfolgt möglichst per Videoaufnahme, um diese dann später in Ruhe zu analysieren. Sind Videoaufzeichnungen nicht möglich, ist auch eine Audioaufnahme denkbar und im Notfall die Beobachtung anhand eines Beobachtungsbogens durch eine andere Lehrperson oder auch StudentIn. Die Schülerperspektive kann ggf. durch eine kurze mündliche Befragung erhoben werden.


    Beispiel für die sinnvolle Verknüpfung von Studienprojekt und Unterrichtsvorhaben (weiterführende Schulen)

    Thema des Studienprojekts: Reading habits

    Mögliche Forschungsfrage: What and how much do students read in their L2 (inside and outside the EFL classroom)?
    Rahmenbedingungen:
    Dieses Studienprojekt kann jahrgangsstufenübergreifend durchgeführt werden. Informationen zu Lesegewohnheiten und der literarischen Sozialisation der SchülerInnen können essentiell wichtig für die Gestaltung des Literaturunterrichts in der Fremdsprache sein. Durch den Einsatz von Fragebögen können Studierende erforschen, welche Aspekte der Literatur für die SchülerInnen von Bedeutung sind und welche vielleicht Probleme bergen. Auch hier können weitere Implikationen für den Englischunterricht gewonnen und somit die Unterrichtsqualität verbessert werden. Auch wenn dieses Studienprojekt weder auf eine bestimmte Altersgruppe, noch Jahrgangsstufe festgelegt sein muss, bieten sich doch eher die Mittel- oder Oberstufe (Jahrgangsstufe 7-12) an, da erfahrungsgemäß nur sehr wenige SchülerInnen bereits in der Unterstufe längere literarische Texte oder Ganzschriften in der Fremdsprache lesen. Zusätzlich wäre es wünschenswert, dieses Studienprojekt in ein Unterrichtsvorhaben über Literatur einzubetten, z.B. "Shakespeare- A literary giant in the 21st century" (Q2) oder "Jugendroman" (Jgst.9).