Universität Bielefeld

© Universität Bielefeld

British and American Studies/
Anglistik

Book Projects

Recent Publications

Erhan Simsek: Creating Realities: Business as a Motif in American Fiction, 1865?1929. Bielefeld: transcript, 2019.
American Culture Studies 25

Business is woven into the very fabric of American life, yet rarely surfaces in the nation's literary history. Even in novels about business, it proves an elusive motif that fails to mirror actual business organizations. This book argues that literary representations of business remain ineffable because business serves potential aesthetic functions, subtly yet meaningfully impacting readers. Exploring the complex representation of business in realist, naturalist and modernist works, Erhan Simsek reveals these functions by analyzing how the motif intertwines with social developments, literary movements and author biographies. He thus illuminates the motif itself while highlighting the utility of a focus on the changing functions of literature.



Christoph Haase / Anne Schröder (eds.): Analogy, Copy, and Representation. Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Bielefeld: Aisthesis, 2018.
Bielefelder Schriften zu Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft 29
BEAST: Bielefeld English and American Studies 7

This volume explores issues in analogy, analogy making, analogy interpreting, and analogy use at the confluence of disciplines such as linguistics, cultural studies, literary studies, and their intersectional disciplines. It represents samples of the state of the art in interdisciplinary analogy research, providing a dialogue between the aforementioned fields, which illuminates relevant aspects of the phenomenon of analogy and thus creates a mutual benefit between and across the different domains. Hence, this volume represents a genuinely interdisciplinary endeavour that adds to and transcends research goals in the cognitive sciences such as the nature of causation, the emergence of structure (in language, culture, and literature) and the evolution of structure-building aspects in language acquisition. This collection of articles thus contributes to a transdisciplinary understanding of analogy, analogy making, analogy inter­preting and analogy use and will inspire many to continue thinking differently about (and with) analogies.



Wilfried Raussert (ed.) The Routledge Companion to Inter-American Studies. New York/London: Routledge, 2017.

An essential overview of this blossoming field, The Routledge Companion to Inter-American Studies is the first collection to draw together the diverse approaches and perspectives on the field, highlighting the importance of Inter-American Studies as it is practiced today. Including contributions from canonical figures in the field as well as a younger generation of scholars, reflecting the foundation and emergence of the field and establishing links between older and newer methodologies, this Companion covers: - Theoretical reflections - Colonial and historical perspectives - Cultural and political intersections - Border discourses - Sites and mobilities - Literary and linguistic perspectives - Area studies, global studies, and postnational studies - Phenomena of transfer, interconnectedness, power asymmetry, and transversality within the Americas.


Maryemma Graham / Wilfried Raussert (eds).Mobile and Entangled America(s). New York/London: Routledge, 2017.

The articles gathered here closely examine a wide variety of cultural phenomena implicated in the "entanglements" which have defined the history of the Americas. From religious networks to music and dance, and across a range of literary and artistic works, the mobility of people, objects, and ideas in the Americas is expertly mapped. At the same time, the book represents a serious enterprise of theory building. Drawing on the histories of postcolonial thought, mobility studies, and work on human migration, Mobile and Entangled America(s) clearly establishes a new interdisciplinary field attentive both to the complexities of cultural form and the pervasiveness of power relations. Each article stands as a significant piece of scholarship on its own, but all are in dialogue with each other. The result is a richly satisfying and important volume of cultural scholarship.



Stefanie Qakernack / Till Meister / Diana Fulger / Nathan Devos (eds.): Exploring the Periphery. Perspectives from Applied Linguistics, Language Teaching, Literary and Cultural Studies. Bielefeld: Aisthesis, 2017.
Bielefelder Schriften zu Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft 28
BEAST: Bielefeld English and American Studies 6

This interdisciplinary collection of contributions aims at exploring and challenging the concept of periphery from various angles and in different fields of Applied Linguistics, Language Teaching, Literary and Cultural Studies. As the ?writing back? paradigm of Postcolonial Studies illustrates, the concept of periphery still implies the existence of a center, which generates and sustains binary oppositions and hierarchical structures. In times of global migration and transnational mobility, the concept of periphery needs to be renegotiated in order to make sense of the newly emergent dichotomies in the linguistic, cultural and literary spheres.



Wilfried Raussert, Brian Rozema, Yolanda Campos, Marius Littschwager (eds.): Key Tropes in Inter-American Studies. Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier/Bilingual Press / Editorial Bilingüe, 2016.

This book is a key text for scholars and students that study the Americas in a multilingual and transdisciplinary fashion. Given the dialogical paradigm that underlies any sincere Inter-American scholarship, it is clear that no single scholarly positioning can capture the complexity of Inter-American connectivity. This is what Inter-American Studies share with Global Studies: A necessity to negotiate multiple and at times conflictive paradigms to tackle its objects of investigation. The volume introduces eight key tropes in Inter-American Studies as they have emerged from the work of the IAS web publication platform fiar forum for inter-american research since the latter's foundation in 2008. The editors have selected eight key tropes and regrouped essays from the period between 2008 and 2015 to highlight some of the most important paradigms for the pursuit of interdisciplinary Inter-American studies. The tropes include "colonial/decolonial," "independence," "religion," "border," "mobility," "race/indigeneity," "gender," and "decolonial reflections." The key tropes chosen should not be seen as separate entities, for in many respects they are related or overlap to some degree; nor are they meant to be an exclusive list of terms. They function more as a representative selection to illustrate recent paradigms and their application.
For every trope the editors have included one article in English and one in Spanish.



Peter Schildhauer: The Personal Weblog: A Linguistic History. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2016.
Hallesche Sprach- und Textforschung 14

The book outlines a coherent genre history of the personal weblog from the perspective of media linguistics. An analysis of a diachronic corpus (1997?2012) suggests distinct phases in the history of the genre. In addition to media linguistics, the author draws on methods from textual and corpus linguistics as well as the social sciences. He traces the personal weblog?s various relations to different on- and offline genres and describes the blog communication form as well as the communicative situation, structural features and several posting genres characteristic of personal weblogs. The findings are embedded into theoretical considerations on genre change in general as well as stability and change of web-based genres in particular.



Marcus Hartner / Marion Schulte (eds.): Migration in Context: Literature, Culture and Language. Bielefeld: Aisthesis, 2016.
Bielefelder Schriften zu Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft 27
BEAST: Bielefeld English and American Studies 5

Migration is an intrinsic part of human history. The move- AV ments of people across various types of borders have contributed to shaping the nations, languages, and cultures of this planet and still continue to do so to the present day. Due to the many forms, facets, and the long history of migratory movements, the academic investigation of migration processes goes far beyond the scope of any single discipline and needs to be conducted from multiple perspectives. This volume contributes to the study of migration by presenting diverse approaches and case studies from British and American literary and cultural studies, linguistics, and didactics. By drawing on a rich assortment of topics, methods, and theories from these different fields of research, it aims to illustrate the conceptual diversity inherent in the study of migration, but also highlights the many cross-disciplinary affinities and connections between approaches in these different areas of research.



Julia Andres: ¡Cuéntame algo! Chicana Narrative Beyond the Borderlands. Trier: WVT Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 2015.

Transnational and Transcultural American Studies are interested in dynamics that do not simply propel contact between geographical and cultural spaces but transcend conceptual boundaries and physical borders in a globalized world. Firmly positioned within these theoretical fields, this book suggests a reading of Chicana Narrative that goes beyond established scholarly particularizations such as 'ethnic minority writing.' Instead, in a creative application of Ken Plummer's vision of a 'Sociology of Stories', it makes a case for flexible, unfinalizable narrative chains that link human stories across genres, times and spaces. Narrowing this global scope to Chicana Narrative outlines a chain of narrative resistance that begins with Gloria Anzaldúa's seminal text Borderlands/La Frontera. This book contends that motifs introduced by Anzaldúa in 1987 continue to be featured in works by Chicana authors Ana Castillo, Sandra Cisneros and Michele Serros, and are ultimately addressed to communities of support worldwide.



Nathan J. Devos: Peer Interactions in New Content and Language Integrated Settings. Heidelberg: Springer, 2016.

Trade schools, universities, and programs for international students have begun to experiment with Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) as a viable pedagogy for instruction, as CLIL increasingly gains recognition as a practical form of language and content education in Europe and beyond, and its application in instructional settings becomes more diverse. Corresponding with CLIL's growth, this book focuses on foreign language use during peer interactions in a new CLIL setting. It particularly concentrates on how to conduct research when the focus is on learner interactions The book includes a framework and ideas for investigating new CLIL contexts in a practical manner, allowing undergraduate and graduate students to conduct their own research in these settings.



C.B. Claiborne / Wilfried Raussert: Transcultural Literacy and Mobility. Houston, TX: Earthborne Press, 2014.

This co-authored book is a critical reflection on African American photography and cultural production through the lens of current global mobility studies. Migrations,particularly in the Americas, embody the complexity of cultural experience. Cultural symbols are not just appropriated, but migrate as well. This brings new and different meanings that we see in dialog with the original cultural meanings. Media curation has to power to bring all of this into focus. It has greatly expanded the potential for the heuristic exploration of the meaning of everyday events. This process of exploration, known by names such as photo-elicitation, auto-driving and visual sociology, have been used since the invention of the photographic process. Today, media curation can be expanded to film, video-clips, podcast, blogs and other content-rich sources. In the book, the authors focus on photographic images tracing African American cultural presences around the globe.



Sarina Schnatwinkel: Das Nichts und der Schmerz. Erzählen bei Bret Easton Ellis. Bielefeld: transcript, 2014.

Bret Easton Ellis's novels require a strong stomach, make the flesh crawl - and yet their fascination is undeniable. While some critics have condemned them, and not without reason, others have celebrated them. What, then, is the appeal of this scandalous author's novels? Sarina Schnatwinkel explores this question in her critical perusal of all six of Ellis's published novels. An emotion-oriented, hermeneutical text analysis coupled with a reader-response critical interpretation unveils textual strategies of an anti-emotional narrative aesthetic which makes the reading experience a painful - but thrilling - one.



Julia Roth: Occidental Readings, Decolonial Practices. A Selection on Gender, Genre, and Coloniality in the Americas. Trier: WVT Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 2014.

"Occidental Readings, Decolonial Practices seeks to bring into dialogue a decolonial inter-American approach with an intersectional gender perspective. Drawing on a long legacy of images and discourses of colonization as en-gendering, this study examines the essays of Argentine author Victoria Ocampo, Mexican painter Frida Kahlo's painted Diary and Guatemalan human rights activist Rigoberta Menchú's Testimonio. Against the backdrop of the Occidentalist reception of the three authors' interventions, the analysis focuses on the entanglement of en-gendering, racialization and coloniality and of 'categories of difference' such as race, class and gender, along with the transnational power dynamics these examples reveal. The book also suggests new units of analysis with regard to interactions between different social positions and geopolitical locations, aiming for a transterritorial understanding of the Americas. Finally, tying back these findings to recent examples and current debates from the German context, this study suggests possible strategies for decolonizing occidental archives, museums, and national frames of analysis, asking what it requires to reverse the perspective on similarities and differences, interdependencies and processes of translation."


Ralf Schneider / Marcus Hartner (eds.) Blending and the Study of Narrative. Approaches and Applications. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2012.
Narratologia 34

"The theory of Blending, or Conceptual Integration, proposed by Gilles Fauconnier and Marc Turner, is one of most promising cognitive theories of meaning production. It has been successfully applied to the analysis of poetic discourse and micro-textual elements, such as metaphor. Prose narrative has so far received significantly less attention. The present volume aims to remedy this situation. Following an introductory discussion of the connections between narrative and the processes of blending, the contributions demonstrate the range of applications of the theory to the study of narrative. They cover issues such as time and space, literary character and perspective, genre, story levels, and fictional minds; some chapters show how such phenomena as metalepsis, counterfactual narration, intermediality, extended metaphors, and suspense can be fruitfully studied from the vantage point of Conceptual Integration. Working within a theoretical framework situated at the intersection of narratology and the cognitive sciences, the book provides both fresh readings for individual literary and film narratives and new impulses for post-classical narratology."



Wilfried Raussert / Graciela Martínez-Zalce (eds.) (Re)Discovering 'America'. Road Movies and Other Travel Narratives in North America. / (Re)Descubriendo 'América'. Road movie y otras narrativas de viaje en América del Norte. Trier: WVT Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012 / Tempe, AZ: Bilingual Press / Editorial Bilingüe, 2012.
Inter-American Studies: Cultures - Societies - History / Estudios Interamericanos: Culturas - Sociedades - Historia, Volume 6

"This collection of essays in English and in Spanish is concerned with the travels of a genre and related issues of artistic, national, and transnational identities. In recent decades there has been a reemergence of road movies on a global scale. This volume is especially interested in the expansion of the genre in the Americas - with a particular focus on what we like to label new and alternative road movies that have come out of Mexico, the United States, and Canada. As scholars and critics we intend to rediscover 'America' through the lens of a transnational, inter-American approach. While, cinematically speaking, we certainly can and have to trace the filmic origins of road movies to the U.S. and Hollywood, we want to emphasize the importance of revisiting the genre within a North-South perspective and to explore how the genre has changed through the cultural flows of globalization in recent decades."



Marcus Hartner. Perspektivische Interaktion im Roman: Kognition,Rezeption, Interpretation. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2012.
Narratologia 32

"How do we internalize literary characters and their fictional consciousness when we are reading? How does multi-perspectivity function? Drawing on modern cognitive research, this study addresses how the perspectives of different characters interact, and demonstrates that this interaction plays a critical role in our understanding and interpretation of literary texts. Using the English novel as an example, the author develops a general theory of perspectival interaction and demonstrates its explanatory power through detailed illustrative analyses."



Anne Schröder / Ulrich Busse / Ralf Schneider (eds.) Codification, Canons, and Curricula. Description and Prescription in Language and Literature. Bielefeld: Aisthesis, 2012.
Bielefelder Schriften zu Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft 26
BEAST: Bielefeld English and American Studies 4

"Language, literature and culture develop according to different sets of rules, and it is the task of linguistics, literary studies and cultural studies to describe both the regularities and the changes in these fields. On the one hand, this description unearths standardization mechanisms that influence practical language application and aesthetic production. On the other hand, although normative and prescriptive statements tend to be avoided to a large extent in the descriptively-aligned philological disciplines, these fields of academic study still contribute to standardization. They implicitly or explicitly define the standards for the 'correct' usage of language or 'good' aesthetic design, for example in reference materials and with the help of other instruments and institutions. Moreover, they contribute to the perpetuation of standards by way of their influence on the curricula of schools and universities. The goal of the volume is to examine the developments and functions of such prescriptive and descriptive tendencies by comparing the similarities and differences in the philological sub-disciplines (linguistics, literary studies and cultural studies, as well as didactics) and their respective subject matters. Several theoretical approaches, models and methods are presented by specialists from different disciplines, opening up new perspectives for further inter- and transdisciplinary research and new vistas on school and university curricula."



Paul Lennon (ed.) Learner Autonomy in the English Classroom. Empirical Studies and Ideas for Teachers. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2012.

Edited by Professor Paul Lennon, Learner Autonomy in the English Classroom, a collection of classroom studies from primary to tertiary levels, has recently been published by Peter Lang. The volume offers insights from research as well as practical teaching ideas for teachers and EFL students, all firmly grounded in second language acquisition theory and established didactic principles. The volume includes studies on multi-media work with dictionaries, reading logs, peer correction, communication strategies, vocabulary learning strategies and oral proficiency, as well as work with literary texts and authentic news texts. Two studies focus specifically on CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning), the teaching of content subjects such as Sport or History in English. Many of the contributors are staff members here in the English section and former students of English at Bielefeld University.



Stephan Gramley. The History of English. An Introduction. London: Routledge, 2012.

"The History of English: An Introduction provides a chronological analysis of the linguistic, social, and cultural development of the English language from before its establishment in Britain around the year 450 to the present. Each chapter represents a new stage in the development of the language from Old English through Middle English to Modern Global English, all illustrated with a rich and diverse selection of primary texts showing changes in language resulting from contact, conquest and domination, and the expansion of English around the world. The History of English goes beyond the usual focus on English in the UK and the USA to include the wider global course of the language during and following the Early Modern English period. This perspective therefore also includes a historical review of English in its pidgin and creole varieties and as a native and/or second language in the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and Australasia".



Luz Angélica Kirschner(ed.) Expanding Latinidad: An Inter-American Perspective. Trier: WVT Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012 / Tempe, AZ: Bilingual Press / Editorial Bilingüe, 2012.

"Latinas and Latinos/Hispanics constitute the largest and fastest-growing minority in the United States. Constructions of an illegal and disorderly latinidad are common in public discourse, but the difficulty in pigeonholing Latinos/Hispanics according to binary American racial categories and the allegedly low levels of race conflict in the otherwise politically and socioeconomically convoluted Latin American region have led some intellectuals to hail US latinidad as a revolutionary force that may change the way the United States talks and thinks about race. This volume engages with the idea of latinidad as a redemptive agent and proposes that liberatory latinidad, whether in the United States or Latin America, is not as inherently inclusive or democratic as some suggest. Deeply ingrained ideologies of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) still linger and continue to have an impact on Latino/Hispanic as well as Latin American identities. Expanding Latinidad does not merely focus on the ambivalent impact of U.S. latinidad or Latin American mestizaje/mestiçagem on race and ethnic relations; it also addresses how south-to-north migration on the American continent has had positive effects on the way people perceive themselves in their new environment. This collection of essays illustrates how an expanded latinidad, a latinidad in the flesh, may hold great potential for reimagining the race and ethnic relations of the miscellaneous communities it embraces".




Dissertations
Completed
fiar

The forum for inter-american research (fiar) is the official electronic journal of the International Association of Inter-American Studies (IAS). fiar was established by the American Studies Program at Bielefeld University in 2008. It fosters a dialogic and interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Americas. fiar is a peer-reviewed online journal. Articles in this journal undergo a double-blind review process and are published in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish. In addition to written work it also publishes selected audiovisual material of conference presentations, keynotes, and video features. The editorial board consists of a broad range of international scholars from diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

Visit Journal
BEAST

BEAST series

Aisthesis Verlag

The series publishes monographs and compilations that pursue a cross-disciplinary approach to the various facets of British and American Studies. "Cross-disciplinary" engages the complex and highly contested status of discipline, area, and nation-state in times of global change and fosters comparison and differentiation along the prefix lines "intra", "inter", and "trans" with the aim to open disciplines for dialogue and exchange. What the series hopes to establish is a wide-ranging, self-reflexive, and self-differentiated way of thinking culture, language, and text as complex and interconnected within contemporary processes of knowledge production and diffusion. The series fosters a new dialogical relationship between literary, cultural and linguistic studies. More specifically the series rearticulates strategies and goals of cultural studies and their crossroads with cognitive and language studies. Manuscripts ideally address a mix of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary approaches to linguistics, literature, film and performance studies as well as teaching. The general editors promote the series to create a vivid dialogue between disciplines in the overall framework of changing British and American Studies. In their endeavor they will be assisted by an international editorial board. All manuscripts will have to undergo a double blind peer reviewing process before publication.

Series Editors
Anne Schröder, Bielefeld University
Ralf Schneider, Bielefeld University
Wilfried Raussert, Bielefeld University

Advisory Board
Jana Gohrisch, University of Hannover
Maryemma Graham, University of Kansas
Stephan Gramley, Bielefeld University
Uwe Küchler, University of Tübingen
Claudia Lange, University of Dresden
Anja Müller-Wood, University of Mainz
Sara Quintero, University of Guadalajara
Laurenz Volkmann, University of Jena


Analogy, Copy, and Representation

Schröder, Anne and Christoph Haase, 2018.

This volume explores issues in analogy, analogy making, analogy interpreting, and analogy use at the confluence of disciplines such as linguistics, cultural studies, literary studies, and their intersectional disciplines. It represents samples of the state of the art in interdisciplinary analogy research, providing a dialogue between the aforementioned fields, which illuminates relevant aspects of the phenomenon of analogy and thus creates a mutual benefit between and across the different domains. Hence, this volume represents a genuinely interdisciplinary endeavour that adds to and transcends research goals in the cognitive sciences such as the nature of causation, the emergence of structure (in language, culture, and literature) and the evolution of structure-building aspects in language acquisition. This collection of articles thus contributes to a transdisciplinary understanding of analogy, analogy making, analogy inter­preting and analogy use and will inspire many to continue thinking differently about (and with) analogies.


Exploring the Periphery

Stefanie Quakernack, Till Meister, Diana Fulger, Nathan Devos, 2017.

This interdisciplinary collection of contributions aims at exploring and challenging the concept of periphery from various angles and in different fields of Applied Linguistics, Language Teaching, Literary and Cultural Studies. As the ?writing back? paradigm of Postcolonial Studies illustrates, the concept of periphery still implies the existence of a center, which generates and sustains binary oppositions and hierarchical structures. In times of global migration and transnational mobility, the concept of periphery needs to be renegotiated in order to make sense of the newly emergent dichotomies in the linguistic, cultural and literary spheres.




Migration in Context: Literature, Culture and Language

Hartner, Marcus and Marion Schulte, 2016.

Migration is an intrinsic part of human history. The movements of people across various types of borders have contributed to shape the nations, languages, and cultures of this planet and still continue to do so to the present day. Due to the many forms, facets, and the long history of migratory movements, the academic investigation of migration processes goes far beyond the scope of any single discipline and needs to be conducted from multiple perspectives. This volume contributes to the study of migration by presenting diverse approaches and case studies from British and American literary and cultural studies, linguistics, and didactics. By drawing on a rich assortment of topics, methods, and theories from these different fields of research, it aims to illustrate the conceptual diversity inherent in the study of migration, but also highlights the many cross-disciplinary affinities and connections between approaches in these different areas of research.


Codification, Canons, and Curricula

Anne Schröder, Ulrich Busse, Ralf Schneider, 2012.

Language, literature and culture develop according to different sets of rules, and it is the task of linguistics, literary studies and cultural studies to describe both the regularities and the changes in these fields. On the one hand, this description unearths standardization mechanisms that influence practical language application and aesthetic production. On the other hand, although normative and prescriptive statements tend to be avoided to a large extent in the descriptively-aligned philological disciplines, these fields of academic study still contribute to standardization. They implicitly or explicitly define the standards for the 'correct' usage of language or 'good' aesthetic design, for example in reference materials and with the help of other instruments and institutions. Moreover, they contribute to the perpetuation of standards by way of their influence on the curricula of schools and universities.

The goal of the present volume is to examine the developments and functions of such prescriptive and descriptive tendencies by comparing the similarities and differences in the philological sub-disciplines (linguistics, literary studies and cultural studies, as well as didactics) and their respective subject matters.

Several theoretical approaches, models and methods are presented by specialists from different disciplines, opening up new perspectives for further inter- and transdisciplinary research and new vistas on school and university curricula.


Remembering and Forgetting: Memory in Images and Texts

Wilfried Raussert, Bond Love, Julia Andres, Stephen Joyce, 2010.

This book is a collection of essays devoted to the representation and politics of memory in cultural texts. How individuals and communities use memory to navigate the current global situation is the subject of many of the essays collected in this volume, while other essays contextualize these strategies by examining functions and interrogations of memory in earlier geopolitical environments. Taken as a whole, they form a multifaceted exploration of how various forms of memory are discursively constructed and nego­tiated in literature, art, media, or other cultural modes of representation. The collection addresses a wide array of texts and cultural contexts.



Cultures in Process: Encounter and Experience

Gramley, Stephan and Ralf Schneider 2009.

Cultures in Process: Encounter and Experience is a wide-ranging collection of essays from the more traditional areas of literary, cultural, and linguistic scholarship, but also from the performance arts, ethnography, gender studies, musicology, sociology, and psychology. The first section deals with the central question of process, and provides examples of how it may be seen as evolving. The second set looks at forms and experiences of cultural encounter that shape social practices and modes of cultural expression, be they those of expatriates in India and Spain, musical traditions in China and performance art in Brazil, or the clash of tradition and modernity in sexual practices in the Arabian Gulf region. This followed by cultural encounter from the vantage point of linguistics: language and culture in intercultural encounters, code-switching among first and second generation bilinguals, and the connections between identity, language, and culture in translation. The analysis of literature is at the center of the fourth selection of contributions: encounter and identity formation in the Indian diaspora, conflicting memories of home and cultural heritage with the new cultural memory, and identity formation in the context of socially dictated racial prejudices. The final papers provide case studies of cultural processes at multifarious levels ? including the ways in which South African concepts and practices of ?indigenous? culture have been subject to (re-)definition in a changing political context, but also the meaning of personhood and identity when normative concepts are called into question by illnesses such as Alzheimer?s, and, finally, two possible concepts of dynamic process in culture as we read Carlyle against the foil of Warburg.


Bielefeld Introduction to Applied Linguistics. A Course Book.

Gramley, Stephan and Vivian Gramley, 2008.

The Bielefeld Introduction to Applied Linguistics is designed to provide a wide-ranging and substantial overview of the field for beginning students. It comprises twenty-seven well-documen- ted contributions based on some of the most salient topics in research and teaching done at the Department of Linguistics and Literature at Bielefeld University.

In four major sections this book looks at questions involving the user/learner (teaching/learning aids; learning processes and methods of gauging them); mental processes (language acquisition and loss); studies involving the linguistic code (metaphor, translation, empirical methods, approaches to texts); and the language community (bilingualism and code-switching, language policy, pragmatics, speaker groups and their languages).

Each contribution offers ? on sometimes varying levels of detail ? a starting point for the young student and provides a useful selection of literature for further reading. Many of the chapters include a selection of do-able exercises based on the material presented.