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  • Philosophy Student Guidance and Deanery of Studies

    The Student Guidance and the Deanery of Studies are the first stop for most questions regarding your studies. We’re glad to help you with problems relating to you course schedules, study planning, overlapping of courses, compensation of disadvantages and more!

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Your contact persons

We offer help with general questions concerning the study of philosophy, your timetables, the choice of modules, hardship regulations, the overlapping of courses and more. You can contact us whatever your degree or study profile (bachelor’s or master’s, academic or educational degree).

Feel free to come talk to us during our open consultation hours. Consultations over the phone or Zoom can be arranged via email.

There will be no office hours on the 16th of April. The next office hours will take place on the 23rd of April.

Questions can also always be asked by email.

Below you’ll find the most important information regarding different aspects of your philosophy studies, as well as answers to frequently asked questions and a glossary explaining important terms.

Niels Neier

Niels Neier

Student Guidance

Office
X-A4-111
Consultation hours
Tuesdays from 10 am to 12 pm
E-Mail
studienberatung2011@uni-bielefeld.de
Telephone
0521/106 - 4589
Responsible for
Every question concerning the study of philosophy
Jennifer Stracke

Jennifer Stracke

Assistant to the Deanery of Studies

Office
X-A4-111
E-Mail
studien.dekanat@uni-bielefeld.de
Responsible for
Assignment of secondary supervisors, course planning

Information on the study of philosophy

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Studienführer

Hier findet ihr den Studienführer der Abteilung für Philosophie.

Planning aids

You can use the following planning aids to get an overview of your studies and to document the courses and modules you have already completed:

Recommendations for the first semester

Here you will find an overview of philosophy courses you should take during your first semester, depending on your study profile. (In German)

Frequently asked questions

You can usually still join a course after a week or two. To make sure, check with the lecturer.

No, you only need to complete each course a single time. One course is assigned to the Basic Module Practical Philosophy, the other to the Basic Module Theoretical Philosophy.

Ideally you should finish a Main Module within a semester or two. Modules have a rotation cycle of one academic year. This means that if a module is available to study during the winter semester, it will also be available to study during the summer semester. However, there is no guarantee that a certain module will be available beyond that academic year.

At the end of a course, you will have the opportunity to write a paper or take an oral exam (or sometimes a written exam). Please hand in your essay or make sure to take your exam until the 31st of March (if you took the course during the winter semester) or the 30th of September (if you took the course during the summer semester).
Solltet ihr aus gutem Grund mehr Zeit benötigen, besteht meistens die Möglichkeit, dies mit den jeweiligen Dozierenden zu besprechen.
Should you have good reasons to require more time, it is usually possible to arrange this with your lecturer.

In most Study profiles, no.

If you study philosophy as part of an academic bachelor’s degree (fachwissenschaftlich) as a major or minor, one oral exam is mandatory. All other module assessments must be in written form. Philosophy main modules that you intend to use for your individual supplementary area can be completed with an oral exam.

If you study philosophy as part of an educational bachelor’s degree (Lehramt) for HRSGe or as a minor for GymGe, you must complete all assessments in written form.

If you study philosophy as part of an educational bachelor’s degree as a major for GymGe, you may complete one assessment with an oral exam.

If you study philosophy as an educational master’s degree for HRSGe or as a major for GymGe, you must select one main module not yet used for your bachelor’s (in HRSGe this has to be a main module in Practical Philosophy). This module may be completed with an oral exam.

If you study philosophy as part of an educational master’s degree as a minor for GymGe, you must select three modules not yet used for your bachelor’s. One of these must be completed with a written assessment. The other two can be completed either in written or oral form.

The assessment that is part of the module “Philosophy for School” may be taken either in written or oral form.

Yes, as long as it is approved and supervised by a member of the department authorised to examining students. Ideally, you should contact a lecturer who focusses on the topic you wish to write about.

No. The Philosophical Introduction and the Philosophical Writing are not part of the three small minor subjects (Ethics, Philosophy of Science and Philosophy of Mind).

No. You may complete both modules with an oral exam. Should you still wish to write a module paper and require help, you can contact the lecturer supervising your paper.

The individual supplementary area enables you to expand your knowledge and skills by making it possible to complete additional modules or courses from your subject(s) or other subjects.

The individual supplementary area of the academic bachelor’s degree as a major makes up 30 credits. The individual supplementary area of the academic master’s degree makes up 15 credits. You can find detailed information on what your individual supplementary area can/should contain here.

The Orientation Talk should be conducted after your first year of study. Contact a lecturer of your choice and make an appointment for the talk. You’ll discuss the courses you have already completed, your present situation, and your future study plans. In case you didn’t conduct the Orientation Talk after your first year, please do so as soon as possible. The talk is a compulsory part of your bachelor’s in philosophy.

You have six months to complete your thesis, starting from the day you registered it. The bachelor’s thesis and the master’s thesis within the Master of Education must be registered at least two months before handing it in. The master’s thesis within the Master of Arts must be registered at least three months before handing it in.

The first assessor must be from the department of philosophy. A second assessor from another department/faculty must be approved by the philosophy department’s student deanery. For this, you need to submit a written request in which you explain why no member of the philosophy department who is entitled to examining students can assess your thesis. Usually, a second assessor can only be from another department/faculty if no one from the philosophy department can assess your thesis. This is rather rare, since you are supposed to discuss a question of philosophical nature in your thesis. Should you consider such a request, please contact Prof. Dr. Michaela Rehm beforehand.

All students whose last name begins with a letter between A and M should contact Mrs. Jutta Oldenburg (X-A2-100, Tel. +49 521 106-3065, pruefungsamt-philosophie@uni-bielefeld.de).

Students whose last name begins with a letter between N and Z, as well as all HEPS students should contact Mrs. Andrea Stürz (X-A2-102, Tel. +49 521 106-3052, pruefungsamt-philosophie@uni-bielefeld.de).

You need to hand in your application for recognition at the examination office. The application for recognition, your transcript, and the table (all in paper form) can be handed in in person or dropped into the mailbox (X-A2, diagonally across from the examination office). Please also send the table to the examination office by email.

In some situations, it is obligatory to request being assigned to a higher semester while applying for recognition.

Such a request is mandatory if switching between the academic degree and the educational degree, and also within the educational degree if you switch from a philosophy minor for GymGe to a philosophy major for GymGe.

Please note that requests to be assigned to a higher semester must be filed until the 15th of August for the winter semester, and until the 15th of February for the summer semester.

Form 5 should be placed in PD Dr. Stephan Schlothfeldt’s mailbox in X-A4. Please hand in your full transcript, not just the part concerning philosophy. That way, should you not have completed enough courses in philosophy, it might be possible to compensate this through additional courses completed in other subjects.

If you have your documents checked within the first four months of your 4th semester, the department may base its assessment on the performance level required after three semesters. From the 5th month of your 4th semester onwards, however, the performance level required after the 4th semester must be taken into account. We therefore advise you to have Form 5 checked by us within the first four months of your 4th semester. It is important that you also submit the form checked by us to the BAföG office within these first four months.

Once your certificate is ready to be picked up, you’ll receive an email. To ensure that you can be notified, make sure to add your email address to your transcript before handing it in.

You can find infformation on the transition to the Master of Arts here. You can find information on the transition to the Master of Education here.

Glossary of important terms

The individual supplementary area is part of the academic major and makes up 30 credits. Of these, 20 credits must be obtained by fully completing one module or more. These do not have to be philosophy modules. You can also study modules belonging to other subjects. Please note that module regulations from other subjects will differ from ours. The remaining 10 credits can be obtained by completing various courses from every subject or by participating in special programs. Further information can be found in the document list entitled “Overwiews and fact sheets”.

Credit Points or ECTS-Credits are synonymous. They don’t describe the achievement itself, but the time and work put into attending, preparing and reviewing courses. (The actual achievement is described by the grade). One Credit Point corresponds to 30 work hours. We use the following calculations to define the amount of Credit Points obtained for some of the most studied courses:

Basic Courses: 2 Credit Points = 60 hours of work. With a semester being 15 weeks long, 30 hours are spent attending the lecture and 30 hours are intended for reviewing them and preparing for the exams. 1 Credit Points = 30 hours of work is added for the tutorial, in which you further review the Basic Course. 2 Credit Points = 60 hours of work (including preparation time) are allocated to the 90-minute exam which closes the Basic Course.

Logic lectures: 1 Credit Point = 30 hour of work during the lecture. Once again, this course is accompanied by a tutorial which is valued at 2 Credit Points = 60 hours of work. Of these, 30 hours are allocated to the tutorial itself, while the other 30 hours are intended for preparing and reviewing the sessions. 2 Credit Points = 60 hours of work (including preparation time) are allocated to the 90-minute exam which closes the Logic lecture.

Philosophical Introduction & Philosophical Writing: 4 Credit Points = 120 hours of work are allocated to each course. Of these, 45 hours correspond to the attendance of the course itself, while 75 hours are allocated to the preparation and review of the course. 1 Credit Point = 30 hours of work is attributed to both the portfolio which closes the Philosophical Introduction and the short paper which closes the Philosophical Writing.

Seminars: 3 Credit Points = 90 hours of work are allocated to each course. Of these, 30 hours correspond to the attendance of the course itself, while 60 hours are allocated to the preparation and review of the texts. 4 Credit Points = 120 hours of work are attributed to the module exam.

Modules are thematic units composed of different courses, which are laid out over two semesters at most, which means you should complete a module within one academic year. An academic year begins in the winter semester. We can only guarantee that courses corresponding to a certain module will be offered in the winter semester and the following summer semester. This means that, if courses belonging to the main module Action Theory are offered in a winter semester and the following summer semester, there is no certainty that courses corresponding to this module will also be offered in the subsequent winter semester.

Basic Modules (Grundmodule) are composed of one Basic Course (Grundkurs), the corresponding tutorial (Tutorium) and either the Philosophical Introduction (Philosophischer Einstieg) or the Philosophical Writing (Philosophisches Schreiben). The Logic Module (Logikmodul) is composed of Logic 1, Logic 2, and the corresponding tutorial. Main Modules (Hauptmodule) are typically made up of two seminars and one module exam. The Subject Didactics Module (Fachdidaktikmodul) is composed of Didactics 1, Didactics 2, and one course imported from educational science. Basics Modules (Grundlagenmodule) and Specialisation Modules (Vertiefungsmodule), which are part of the small minors, as well as Philosophy for School (Philosophie für die Schule), which is part of the educational degrees, are structurally identical to main modules. The Basic Knowledge Philosophy Module (Grundwissen Philosophie) in the small minors is composed of both Basic Courses.

These modules are mandatory.

These are a series of modules of which a certain number is compulsory. You are free to choose which of these modules you wish to study. However, you may only study every module once (for example, the main module Applied Ethics may not be studied twice).

To complete a module, you need to successfully pass an examination, which is why examinations are also called module exams (Modulabschlussprüfung). For main modules the possible forms of examinations are papers of about 4.000 words, oral exams of 30 minutes, or written exams of 90 minutes. The number of main modules that must be completed with a paper or an oral exam varies depending on you study profile. You can check this in the subject-specific regulations (FsB) and our study plans.

A few different forms of examinations (portfolios, internship reports, presentations/talks etc.) are used in some other modules. This too can be verified in the subject-specific regulations (FsB) and our study plans.

This abbreviation in the module lists stands for “graded examinations” (benotete Prüfungsleistung). Using this, you can check how many graded examinations are necessary to complete a module.

This abbreviation in the module lists stands for “ungraded examinations” (unbenotete Prüfungsleistung). Using this, you can check how many ungraded examinations are necessary to complete a module.

Within the philosophy bachelor only the examination within the Philosophical Introduction (Philosophischer Einstieg) and the internship report that is part of the optional Internship Module (Praktikumsmodul) are ungraded.

Within the academic philosophy master’s degree only the internship report that is part of the optional Internship Module (Praxismodul) is ungraded.

Both examinations within the Logic module are graded, but only the better of the two grades makes up the final module grade.

Study requirements document your participation in a course and are entered into your transcript by your lecturer after having completed it. Study requirement are typically ungraded and can take the form of presentations, exercises, discussion or seminar reports, short essays etc. In any case, lecturers cannot expect students to exceed written contributions of 1.200 words or oral contributions of 10 to 20 minutes within the philosophy bachelor’s degree and the educational philosophy master’s degree. Within the academic philosophy master’s degree, lecturers cannot expect students to exceed written contributions of 2.000 words or oral contributions of 20 minutes.

The different degrees you can study for are the Bachelor of Arts in philosophy, the Master of Arts in philosophy, the Master of Education in philosophy and the Master of Arts in History, Economy and Philosophy of Science/Interdisciplinary Studies of Science (HEPS/ISoS).

There are many different study profiles to choose from within the different degrees. How important the share of philosophy is and which modules you must study depends on your study profile. You can find an overview of all study profiles here.


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